Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activity of tea polyphenols

Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activity of tea polyphenols Tea is the most popular beverage, consumed by over two thirds of the world's population. Tea is processed differently in different parts of the world to give green (20%), black (78%) or oolong tea (2%). Green tea is consumed mostly in Japan and China. The antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities of green tea are extensively examined. The chemical components of green and black tea are polyphenols, which include EC, ECG, EGC, EGCG and TFs. This article reviews the epidemiological and experimental studies on the antimutagenicity and anticarcinogenicity of tea extracts and tea polyphenols. In Japan, an epidemiological study showed an inverse relationship between habitual green tea drinking and the standardized mortality rates for cancer. Some cohort studies on Chanoyu (Japanese tea ceremony) women teachers also showed that their mortality ratio including deaths caused by malignant neoplasms were surprisingly low. The antimutagenic activity against various mutagens of tea extracts and polyphenols including ECG and EGCG has been demonstrated in microbial systems ( Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli ), mammalian cell systems and in vivo animal tests. The anticarcinogenic activity of tea phenols has been shown in experimental animals such as rats and mice, in transplantable tumors, carcinogen-induced tumors in digestive organs, mammary glands, hepatocarcinomas, lung cancers, skin tumors, leukemia, tumor promotion and metastasis. The mechanisms of antimutagenesis and anticarcinogenesis of tea polyphenols suggest that the inhibition of tumors may be due to both extracellular and intracellular mechanisms including the modulation of metabolism, blocking or suppression, modulation of DNA replication and repair effects, promotion, inhibition of invasion and metastasis, and induction of novel mechanisms. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mutation Research - Reviews Elsevier

Antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activity of tea polyphenols

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
1383-5742
eISSN
1388-2139
DOI
10.1016/S1383-5742(98)00019-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Tea is the most popular beverage, consumed by over two thirds of the world's population. Tea is processed differently in different parts of the world to give green (20%), black (78%) or oolong tea (2%). Green tea is consumed mostly in Japan and China. The antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic activities of green tea are extensively examined. The chemical components of green and black tea are polyphenols, which include EC, ECG, EGC, EGCG and TFs. This article reviews the epidemiological and experimental studies on the antimutagenicity and anticarcinogenicity of tea extracts and tea polyphenols. In Japan, an epidemiological study showed an inverse relationship between habitual green tea drinking and the standardized mortality rates for cancer. Some cohort studies on Chanoyu (Japanese tea ceremony) women teachers also showed that their mortality ratio including deaths caused by malignant neoplasms were surprisingly low. The antimutagenic activity against various mutagens of tea extracts and polyphenols including ECG and EGCG has been demonstrated in microbial systems ( Salmonella typhimurium and Escherichia coli ), mammalian cell systems and in vivo animal tests. The anticarcinogenic activity of tea phenols has been shown in experimental animals such as rats and mice, in transplantable tumors, carcinogen-induced tumors in digestive organs, mammary glands, hepatocarcinomas, lung cancers, skin tumors, leukemia, tumor promotion and metastasis. The mechanisms of antimutagenesis and anticarcinogenesis of tea polyphenols suggest that the inhibition of tumors may be due to both extracellular and intracellular mechanisms including the modulation of metabolism, blocking or suppression, modulation of DNA replication and repair effects, promotion, inhibition of invasion and metastasis, and induction of novel mechanisms.

Journal

Mutation Research - ReviewsElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1999

References

  • Aetiological factors in oesophageal cancer in Singapore Chinese
    De Jong, U.W.; Breslow, N.; Hong, J.G.E.; Sridharan, W.; Shanmugaratnam, K.
  • Tea polyphenols as inhibitors of mutagenicity of major classes of carcinogens
    Weisburger, J.H.; Hara, Y.; Dolan, L.; Luo, F.-Q.; Pittman, B.; Zang, E.
  • Inhibition of PhIP mutagenicity by catechins and by theaflavins and gallate esters
    Apostolides, Z.; Balentine, D.A.; Harbowy, M.E.; Hara, Y.; Weisburger, J.H.
  • Screening of tea clones for inhibition of PhIP mutagenicity
    Apostolides, Z.; Weisburger, J.H.
  • Protection by green tea, black tea and indole-3-carbinol against 2-amino-3-methylimidazo(4,5- f )quinoline-induced DNA adducts and colonic aberrant crypts in F344 rat
    Xu, M.; Bailey, A.C.; Hernaez, J.F.; Taoka, C.R.; Schut, H.A.J.; Dashwood, R.H.
  • Inhibition of aflatoxin B 1 -induced initiation of hepatocarcinogenesis in the rats by green tea
    Qin, G.; Gopalan-Kriczky, P.; Su, J.; Ning, Y.; Lotliker, P.D.
  • Tea, or tea and milk, inhibit mammary gland and colon carcinogenesis in rats
    Weisburger, J.H.; Rivenson, A.; Garr, K.; Aliaga, C.
  • Inhibition of influenza virus infection by tea
    Nakayama, M.; Toda, M.; Okubo, S.; Shimamura, T.

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