Anger and flaming in computer-mediated negotiation among strangers

Anger and flaming in computer-mediated negotiation among strangers The present study explores the antecedents of the antinormative hostile communication of emotion, termed flaming, in the context of computer-mediated negotiation. We find that flaming is associated with anger directed toward the negotiating context; this can occur when a negotiator becomes frustrated due to problems with communication channel characteristics or due to uncertainty surrounding the negotiation task. We also find that flaming is associated with anger directed toward a negotiator's partner, which can occur when a negotiator perceives that the partner is being unfair. We find further that anger totally mediates the relationships between flaming and its antecedents. These findings provide the basis to argue that anger reduction can effectively decrease flaming, independent of the existence of flaming antecedents, such as unfairness. We therefore provide suggestions that can help with the reduction of anger in such circumstances. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Decision Support Systems Elsevier

Anger and flaming in computer-mediated negotiation among strangers

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0167-9236
eISSN
1873-5797
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.dss.2008.10.008
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The present study explores the antecedents of the antinormative hostile communication of emotion, termed flaming, in the context of computer-mediated negotiation. We find that flaming is associated with anger directed toward the negotiating context; this can occur when a negotiator becomes frustrated due to problems with communication channel characteristics or due to uncertainty surrounding the negotiation task. We also find that flaming is associated with anger directed toward a negotiator's partner, which can occur when a negotiator perceives that the partner is being unfair. We find further that anger totally mediates the relationships between flaming and its antecedents. These findings provide the basis to argue that anger reduction can effectively decrease flaming, independent of the existence of flaming antecedents, such as unfairness. We therefore provide suggestions that can help with the reduction of anger in such circumstances.

Journal

Decision Support SystemsElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2009

References

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    Alonzo, M.; Aiken, M.
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    Kock, N.
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