Analysis of the relationships between environmental noise and urban morphology

Analysis of the relationships between environmental noise and urban morphology Understanding the effects of urban morphology on urban environmental noise (UEN) at a regional scale is crucial for creating a pleasant urban acoustic environment. This study seeks to investigate how the urban morphology influences the UEN in the Shenzhen metropolitan region of China, by employing remote sensing and geographic information data. The UEN in this study consists of not only regional environmental noise (RN), but also traffic noise (TN). The experimental results reveal the following findings: 1) RN is positively correlated with the nighttime light intensity (NTL) and land surface temperature (LST) (p < 0.05). More interestingly, landscape composition and configuration can also significantly affect RN. For instance, urban vegetation can mitigate the RN (r = −0.411, p < 0.01). There is a reduced RN effect when fewer buildings exist in an urban landscape, in terms of the positive relationship between building density and RN (r = 0.188, p < 0.01). Given the same percentage of building area, buildings are more effective at reducing noise when they are distributed across the urban scenes, rather than being spatially concentrated (r = −0.205, p < 0.01). 2) TN positively relates to large (r = 0.520, p < 0.01) and small–medium (r = 0.508, p < 0.01) vehicle flow. In addition, vegetation along or near roads can alleviate the TN effect (r = −0.342, p < 0.01). TN can also become more severe in urban landscapes where there is higher road density (r = 0.307, p < 0.01). 3) Concerning the urban functional zones, traffic land is the greatest contributor to urban RN, followed by mixed residential and commercial land. The findings revealed by this research will indicate how to mitigate UEN. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

Analysis of the relationships between environmental noise and urban morphology

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.10.126
Publisher site
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Abstract

Understanding the effects of urban morphology on urban environmental noise (UEN) at a regional scale is crucial for creating a pleasant urban acoustic environment. This study seeks to investigate how the urban morphology influences the UEN in the Shenzhen metropolitan region of China, by employing remote sensing and geographic information data. The UEN in this study consists of not only regional environmental noise (RN), but also traffic noise (TN). The experimental results reveal the following findings: 1) RN is positively correlated with the nighttime light intensity (NTL) and land surface temperature (LST) (p < 0.05). More interestingly, landscape composition and configuration can also significantly affect RN. For instance, urban vegetation can mitigate the RN (r = −0.411, p < 0.01). There is a reduced RN effect when fewer buildings exist in an urban landscape, in terms of the positive relationship between building density and RN (r = 0.188, p < 0.01). Given the same percentage of building area, buildings are more effective at reducing noise when they are distributed across the urban scenes, rather than being spatially concentrated (r = −0.205, p < 0.01). 2) TN positively relates to large (r = 0.520, p < 0.01) and small–medium (r = 0.508, p < 0.01) vehicle flow. In addition, vegetation along or near roads can alleviate the TN effect (r = −0.342, p < 0.01). TN can also become more severe in urban landscapes where there is higher road density (r = 0.307, p < 0.01). 3) Concerning the urban functional zones, traffic land is the greatest contributor to urban RN, followed by mixed residential and commercial land. The findings revealed by this research will indicate how to mitigate UEN.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2018

References

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