An overview of microdiesel — A sustainable future source of renewable energy

An overview of microdiesel — A sustainable future source of renewable energy Microdiesel obtained from microbes using renewable materials as carbon sources is an important alternative to petroleum diesel. This review provides information related to microdiesel production using various carbon sources; i.e. carbon dioxide, C2, saccharides, and lignocellulose. Microbes can accumulate different contents of fatty acids in the form of triacylglycerol (TAG). Not all microbes store fatty acids and utilize a broad range of substrates as carbon sources, and vice versa. Microbes can be engineered to consume various carbon sources, and accumulate increased amounts of fatty acids with different composition. The properties of microdiesel depend on its fatty acid profile, which in turn determines its efficacy. The structural features of the fatty acids, such as carbon chain length, branching and degree of unsaturation, affect the physiochemical properties of the biodiesel (cetane number (CN), oxidation stability (OS), iodine value (IV), cold flow properties, density and kinematic viscosity). Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles can be used to evaluate the key properties of biodiesel, i.e. the stability of the oil used. The overview presented herein concludes that microdiesel production using non-feed carbon sources and genetically engineered microbes shows much promise. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews Elsevier

An overview of microdiesel — A sustainable future source of renewable energy

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/an-overview-of-microdiesel-a-sustainable-future-source-of-renewable-q3x35TRtef
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1364-0321
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.rser.2017.05.138
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Microdiesel obtained from microbes using renewable materials as carbon sources is an important alternative to petroleum diesel. This review provides information related to microdiesel production using various carbon sources; i.e. carbon dioxide, C2, saccharides, and lignocellulose. Microbes can accumulate different contents of fatty acids in the form of triacylglycerol (TAG). Not all microbes store fatty acids and utilize a broad range of substrates as carbon sources, and vice versa. Microbes can be engineered to consume various carbon sources, and accumulate increased amounts of fatty acids with different composition. The properties of microdiesel depend on its fatty acid profile, which in turn determines its efficacy. The structural features of the fatty acids, such as carbon chain length, branching and degree of unsaturation, affect the physiochemical properties of the biodiesel (cetane number (CN), oxidation stability (OS), iodine value (IV), cold flow properties, density and kinematic viscosity). Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles can be used to evaluate the key properties of biodiesel, i.e. the stability of the oil used. The overview presented herein concludes that microdiesel production using non-feed carbon sources and genetically engineered microbes shows much promise.

Journal

Renewable and Sustainable Energy ReviewsElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off