An actin gene-related polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for identification of chicken in meat mixtures

An actin gene-related polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for identification of chicken in meat... Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA extracted from muscle, a single pair of oligonucleotide primers can yield amplification products from several members of the actin multigene family simultaneously. These multiple PCR products form species-specific “fingerprints” on gel electrophoresis which may be useful for meat authentication. However, for analysis of meat mixtures, the presence of a single band unique to a species would have many advantages over a multi-component fingerprint. A procedure is described in which primers amplify at a single actin gene locus, giving a positive band with DNA extracted from chicken and turkey, but no reaction with duck, pheasant, porcine, bovine, ovine or equine DNA. The chicken signal was clearly detectable with DNA from meat admixtures containing 1% chicken/99% lamb and from meat heat-treated at 120°C. For further discrimination, the chicken PCR product could be differentiated from turkey by restriction enzyme digestion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Meat Science Elsevier

An actin gene-related polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test for identification of chicken in meat mixtures

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0309-1740
DOI
10.1016/S0309-1740(99)00060-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA extracted from muscle, a single pair of oligonucleotide primers can yield amplification products from several members of the actin multigene family simultaneously. These multiple PCR products form species-specific “fingerprints” on gel electrophoresis which may be useful for meat authentication. However, for analysis of meat mixtures, the presence of a single band unique to a species would have many advantages over a multi-component fingerprint. A procedure is described in which primers amplify at a single actin gene locus, giving a positive band with DNA extracted from chicken and turkey, but no reaction with duck, pheasant, porcine, bovine, ovine or equine DNA. The chicken signal was clearly detectable with DNA from meat admixtures containing 1% chicken/99% lamb and from meat heat-treated at 120°C. For further discrimination, the chicken PCR product could be differentiated from turkey by restriction enzyme digestion.

Journal

Meat ScienceElsevier

Published: Dec 1, 1999

References

  • Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) fingerprints for identification of red meat animal species
    Koh, M.C.; Lim, C.H.; Chua, S.B.; Chew, S.T.; Phang, S.T.W.
  • Use of mutagenically PCR for the detection of the mutation associated with porcine stress syndrome
    Lockley, A.K.; Bruce, J.S.; Franklin, S.J.; Bardsley, R.G.
  • A quick and simple method for the identification of meat species and meat products by PCR assay
    Matsunaga, T.; Chikuni, K.; Tanabe, R.; Muroya, S.; Shibata, K.; Yamada, J.; Shinmura, Y.

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