Allopregnanolone: State of the art

Allopregnanolone: State of the art Allopregnanolone, also known as tetrahydroprogesterone, was for a long time considered one of the many intermediate metabolites of the steroidogenic pathways, arising from progesterone (PROG), the gonadal hormone responsible for sexual receptivity. The principal sources of both PROG and allopregnanolone were considered the steroidogenic tissues as the ovary, testis and adrenal glands ( Ficher and Steinberger, 1971 ). In the early 80s, it was shown that the brain is capable of de novo biosynthesis of steroids. The first clue of neurosteroidogenesis came from the observations that pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and their sulphate derivatives accumulate in the brain of castrated and adrenalectomized rats ( Corpechot et al., 1981 ). The confirmation of the existence of steroidogenic pathways within the brain was obtained during the year by the demonstration of the presence of the specific steroidogenic enzymes in both neurons and glial cells ( Pelletier, 2010 ).</P>The last decades of investigation have clearly supported the concept that in the nervous system, PROG is not only a physiological regulator of reproduction ( Banks and Freeman, 1980; Barraclough et al., 1986; Brann and Mahesh, 1991; Micevych and Sinchak, 2008, 2011; Skinner et al., 1998 ) but also regulates development of neurons ( Giachino http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Progress in Neurobiology Elsevier

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/allopregnanolone-state-of-the-art-VSyt8LymbX
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-0082
DOI
10.1016/j.pneurobio.2013.09.005
pmid
24121112
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Allopregnanolone, also known as tetrahydroprogesterone, was for a long time considered one of the many intermediate metabolites of the steroidogenic pathways, arising from progesterone (PROG), the gonadal hormone responsible for sexual receptivity. The principal sources of both PROG and allopregnanolone were considered the steroidogenic tissues as the ovary, testis and adrenal glands ( Ficher and Steinberger, 1971 ). In the early 80s, it was shown that the brain is capable of de novo biosynthesis of steroids. The first clue of neurosteroidogenesis came from the observations that pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and their sulphate derivatives accumulate in the brain of castrated and adrenalectomized rats ( Corpechot et al., 1981 ). The confirmation of the existence of steroidogenic pathways within the brain was obtained during the year by the demonstration of the presence of the specific steroidogenic enzymes in both neurons and glial cells ( Pelletier, 2010 ).</P>The last decades of investigation have clearly supported the concept that in the nervous system, PROG is not only a physiological regulator of reproduction ( Banks and Freeman, 1980; Barraclough et al., 1986; Brann and Mahesh, 1991; Micevych and Sinchak, 2008, 2011; Skinner et al., 1998 ) but also regulates development of neurons ( Giachino

Journal

Progress in NeurobiologyElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 2014

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off