Algorithms for extracting information from remote thermal-IR observations of the earth's surface

Algorithms for extracting information from remote thermal-IR observations of the earth's surface Thermal infrared remote sensing offers the possibility of monitoring the surface energy budget on regional and global scales. However, thermal observations have had limited utility because of difficulties associated with unknown surface emissivities, challenging atmospheric corrections, and the presence of numerous variables that affect the relationship between thermal radiance and the partitioning of energy fluxes at the surface. The importance of distinguishing between aerodynamic and radiative temperatures is discussed and definitions for each are proposed. Considerable progress is being made with atmospheric corrections and measurement of surface emissivity so that accuracies of 1° to 2°C in surface infrared temperature and 0.01 to 0.02 in surface emissivity may be within reach. Five methods are described for extracting information about the surface energy budget from a combination of satellite thermal observations and various amounts of ancillary data. Although no single method appears to work under all conditions, uncertainties in daily fluxes of surface sensible and latent heat appear to be 1 to 2 MJ m −2 based on past studies. Thermal infrared observations toill continue to play an essential role in partitioning available surface energy into sensible and latent heat components. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Remote Sensing of Environment Elsevier

Algorithms for extracting information from remote thermal-IR observations of the earth's surface

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0034-4257
DOI
10.1016/0034-4257(94)00072-U
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Thermal infrared remote sensing offers the possibility of monitoring the surface energy budget on regional and global scales. However, thermal observations have had limited utility because of difficulties associated with unknown surface emissivities, challenging atmospheric corrections, and the presence of numerous variables that affect the relationship between thermal radiance and the partitioning of energy fluxes at the surface. The importance of distinguishing between aerodynamic and radiative temperatures is discussed and definitions for each are proposed. Considerable progress is being made with atmospheric corrections and measurement of surface emissivity so that accuracies of 1° to 2°C in surface infrared temperature and 0.01 to 0.02 in surface emissivity may be within reach. Five methods are described for extracting information about the surface energy budget from a combination of satellite thermal observations and various amounts of ancillary data. Although no single method appears to work under all conditions, uncertainties in daily fluxes of surface sensible and latent heat appear to be 1 to 2 MJ m −2 based on past studies. Thermal infrared observations toill continue to play an essential role in partitioning available surface energy into sensible and latent heat components.

Journal

Remote Sensing of EnvironmentElsevier

Published: Jan 1, 1995

References

  • Principles of Environmental Physics
    Monteith, J.L.; Unsworth, M.H.
  • The potential of remotely sensed thermal infrared data to infer surface soil moisture and evaporation
    Price, J.C.

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