Agronomic and physiological contributions to the yield improvement of soybean cultivars released from 1950 to 2006 in Northeast China

Agronomic and physiological contributions to the yield improvement of soybean cultivars released... Increasing yield is a high priority in most breeding programs. Approximately 600 soybean cultivars had been released by the end of the last century in Northeast China. Understanding the agronomic and physiological changes is essential for planning further plant breeding strategies in soybean. In this study, 45 representative soybean cultivars, from maturity groups 00 and 0, released from 1950 to 2006 in Northeast China were compared in field conditions for 3 consecutive years. A positive correlation between seed yield and year of cultivar release was indicated with a 0.58% average annual increase. Seed number per plant was the most important contributor to yield gain, with a 0.41% increase per year. Pod number per plant and seed size varied slightly with the year of cultivar release. Although variation in protein was from 37.0% to 45.5%, and oil concentration was from 16.7% to 22.0%, their concentrations were not consistently related to year of cultivar release. A 33% increase in the photosynthetic rate, 10.6% increase in plant dry weight and 19.0% increase in harvest index (HI) were found, while leaf area index (LAI) decreased by 17.3%. Modern cultivars have higher photosynthetic rates than their predecessors. The reduced plant height gave increased resistance to lodging, with the lodging score dropping from 3.2 in 1951 to 1.0 in 2006. Seed resistances to disease and pest infestation were also improved. Yield stability was enhanced over years, which could be attributed to the stable pod production across different environments. A flow diagram to explain the contributors to genetic improvement of soybeans in Northeast China was developed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Field Crops Research Elsevier

Agronomic and physiological contributions to the yield improvement of soybean cultivars released from 1950 to 2006 in Northeast China

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0378-4290
eISSN
1872-6852
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.fcr.2009.10.016
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Increasing yield is a high priority in most breeding programs. Approximately 600 soybean cultivars had been released by the end of the last century in Northeast China. Understanding the agronomic and physiological changes is essential for planning further plant breeding strategies in soybean. In this study, 45 representative soybean cultivars, from maturity groups 00 and 0, released from 1950 to 2006 in Northeast China were compared in field conditions for 3 consecutive years. A positive correlation between seed yield and year of cultivar release was indicated with a 0.58% average annual increase. Seed number per plant was the most important contributor to yield gain, with a 0.41% increase per year. Pod number per plant and seed size varied slightly with the year of cultivar release. Although variation in protein was from 37.0% to 45.5%, and oil concentration was from 16.7% to 22.0%, their concentrations were not consistently related to year of cultivar release. A 33% increase in the photosynthetic rate, 10.6% increase in plant dry weight and 19.0% increase in harvest index (HI) were found, while leaf area index (LAI) decreased by 17.3%. Modern cultivars have higher photosynthetic rates than their predecessors. The reduced plant height gave increased resistance to lodging, with the lodging score dropping from 3.2 in 1951 to 1.0 in 2006. Seed resistances to disease and pest infestation were also improved. Yield stability was enhanced over years, which could be attributed to the stable pod production across different environments. A flow diagram to explain the contributors to genetic improvement of soybeans in Northeast China was developed.

Journal

Field Crops ResearchElsevier

Published: Jan 4, 2010

References

  • Resistance to insect pests: what do legumes have to offer?
    Edwards, O.; Singh, K.B.
  • Soybean yield physiology and development of high-yielding practices in Northeast China
    Liu, X.B.; Jin, J.; Wang, G.H.; Herbert, S.J.

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