Aging of low and high amylose rice at elevated temperature: Mechanism and predictive modeling

Aging of low and high amylose rice at elevated temperature: Mechanism and predictive modeling The objective of this research was to study the changes in physicochemical properties of rice during elevated temperature storage. Paddy of three rice cultivars with low amylose content (9–11%) and the other three with high amylose content (23–25%) was stored at 39.2 °C and 43.1% relative humidity up to 31 weeks. Drastic changes in moisture content and some parameters representing cooking qualities, cooked rice texture and pasting properties occurred during the first four weeks of aging. At similar aging time, low amylose rice had higher adhesiveness, peak viscosity and breakdown, but had lower pasting temperature than high amylose rice. Time-dependent change in adhesiveness and pasting temperature was predicted by fractional conversion model (0.60 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.94). Difference among rate constant values of the data from low and high amylose rice was found. Proportion of high molecular weight proteins (>225 kDa) tended to increase over time. However, enthalpy of amylose-lipid complex melting fluctuated during storage. Changes in protein molecular weight pattern could thus be key mechanism of rice aging at elevated temperature. NIR-based predictive models for minimum cooking time, adhesiveness, pasting temperature, peak viscosity, and breakdown of rice samples were established (R2 of calibration ≥ 0.81; R2 of validation ≥ 0.87). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Cereal Science Elsevier

Aging of low and high amylose rice at elevated temperature: Mechanism and predictive modeling

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0733-5210
eISSN
1095-9963
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jcs.2016.06.004
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The objective of this research was to study the changes in physicochemical properties of rice during elevated temperature storage. Paddy of three rice cultivars with low amylose content (9–11%) and the other three with high amylose content (23–25%) was stored at 39.2 °C and 43.1% relative humidity up to 31 weeks. Drastic changes in moisture content and some parameters representing cooking qualities, cooked rice texture and pasting properties occurred during the first four weeks of aging. At similar aging time, low amylose rice had higher adhesiveness, peak viscosity and breakdown, but had lower pasting temperature than high amylose rice. Time-dependent change in adhesiveness and pasting temperature was predicted by fractional conversion model (0.60 ≤ R2 ≤ 0.94). Difference among rate constant values of the data from low and high amylose rice was found. Proportion of high molecular weight proteins (>225 kDa) tended to increase over time. However, enthalpy of amylose-lipid complex melting fluctuated during storage. Changes in protein molecular weight pattern could thus be key mechanism of rice aging at elevated temperature. NIR-based predictive models for minimum cooking time, adhesiveness, pasting temperature, peak viscosity, and breakdown of rice samples were established (R2 of calibration ≥ 0.81; R2 of validation ≥ 0.87).

Journal

Journal of Cereal ScienceElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 2016

References

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