Advances in microalgae engineering and synthetic biology applications for biofuel production

Advances in microalgae engineering and synthetic biology applications for biofuel production Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2013, 17 :489–495</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Energy </P>Edited by Michael D Burkart and Stephen P Mayfield </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 16th May 2013</P>1367-5931/$ – see front matter, © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.03.038 </P>Introduction</h5> Recent advances in the development of genetic tools and in silico predictive capacity have facilitated the characterization and manipulation of algal genomes in the effort to develop designed algal biofuel production strains. Several strategies for increasing biofuel productivity from microalgae are now being examined, from optimizing light utilization or altering carbon flow pathways for increased biomass accumulation, to modifying lipid production. Depending on the properties of fuel desired, microalgae have potential for producing lipids for conversion into biodiesel, for hydrogen production, and even as a source of ethanol [ 1 ]; and several advances have been made to improve yields in each of these approaches. Algae can also produce complex hydrocarbons, for example terpenoids, which are useful both as biofuel additives and as valuable coproducts that could bolster the economic feasibility of the emerging algal biofuels industry ( Figure 1 ). First, advances in genomic analysis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Opinion in Chemical Biology Elsevier

Advances in microalgae engineering and synthetic biology applications for biofuel production

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/advances-in-microalgae-engineering-and-synthetic-biology-applications-HCyjoSYOqv
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
1367-5931
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.03.038
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Current Opinion in Chemical Biology 2013, 17 :489–495</P>This review comes from a themed issue on Energy </P>Edited by Michael D Burkart and Stephen P Mayfield </P>For a complete overview see the Issue and the Editorial </P>Available online 16th May 2013</P>1367-5931/$ – see front matter, © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.</P>http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.03.038 </P>Introduction</h5> Recent advances in the development of genetic tools and in silico predictive capacity have facilitated the characterization and manipulation of algal genomes in the effort to develop designed algal biofuel production strains. Several strategies for increasing biofuel productivity from microalgae are now being examined, from optimizing light utilization or altering carbon flow pathways for increased biomass accumulation, to modifying lipid production. Depending on the properties of fuel desired, microalgae have potential for producing lipids for conversion into biodiesel, for hydrogen production, and even as a source of ethanol [ 1 ]; and several advances have been made to improve yields in each of these approaches. Algae can also produce complex hydrocarbons, for example terpenoids, which are useful both as biofuel additives and as valuable coproducts that could bolster the economic feasibility of the emerging algal biofuels industry ( Figure 1 ). First, advances in genomic analysis

Journal

Current Opinion in Chemical BiologyElsevier

Published: Jun 1, 2013

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off