Adaptation benefits and costs: are they important in the global policy picture and how can we estimate them?

Adaptation benefits and costs: are they important in the global policy picture and how can we... 1 <h5>Introduction</h5> This paper has three broad objectives. The first is to examine a little more carefully a main theme of this issue of Global Environmental namely: the usefulness of information about the global marginal benefits of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions to various groups in both developed and developing countries. The second is to comment on the way in which adaptation to climate change is treated in the lead paper by Hitz and Smith (2004) , hereafter referred to as HS, and to summarise what I see as the main technical issues in evaluating the contribution of adaptation to avoiding climate change damages. The last objective is to show how these issues can be incorporated into a conceptual framework for characterizing adaptation in regional and multi-regional sectoral assessments of climate. At the outset, it is important to clarify the reasons for the discussion of local adaptation benefits in this issue of Global Environmental Change (GEC), which is mainly about the global benefits of emissions reductions policies. There are two issues here: The first point to make is that the benefits of both mitigation and adaptation are, in fact, local in nature. While mitigation and adaptation reduce climate http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Global Environmental Change Elsevier

Adaptation benefits and costs: are they important in the global policy picture and how can we estimate them?

Global Environmental Change, Volume 14 (3) – Oct 1, 2004

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0959-3780
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.gloenvcha.2004.04.002
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 <h5>Introduction</h5> This paper has three broad objectives. The first is to examine a little more carefully a main theme of this issue of Global Environmental namely: the usefulness of information about the global marginal benefits of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions to various groups in both developed and developing countries. The second is to comment on the way in which adaptation to climate change is treated in the lead paper by Hitz and Smith (2004) , hereafter referred to as HS, and to summarise what I see as the main technical issues in evaluating the contribution of adaptation to avoiding climate change damages. The last objective is to show how these issues can be incorporated into a conceptual framework for characterizing adaptation in regional and multi-regional sectoral assessments of climate. At the outset, it is important to clarify the reasons for the discussion of local adaptation benefits in this issue of Global Environmental Change (GEC), which is mainly about the global benefits of emissions reductions policies. There are two issues here: The first point to make is that the benefits of both mitigation and adaptation are, in fact, local in nature. While mitigation and adaptation reduce climate

Journal

Global Environmental ChangeElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2004

References

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