Active taste compounds in juice from oranges symptomatic for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus greening disease

Active taste compounds in juice from oranges symptomatic for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus greening... Citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing (HLB), compromises the quality of citrus fruit and juice, causing increased bitterness, metallic taste, astringency and a burning mouthfeel. The chemical basis responsible for these changes remains largely unknown other than the roles of the bitter limonoids, limonin and nomilin, and of flavonoids that may cause astringency. A combination of chemical and sensory analyses was used to identify bitter components in HBL-affected orange juice (HLBOJ), and compared with juice from healthy fruit. DNA analysis of the juice revealed that HLBOJ was well infected with the bacteria, with Ct value of 27 compared with 33 for the healthy juice. There were differences (at least P < 0.05) in pH, titratable acidity (TA), soluble solids content (SSC), SSC/TA, total sugars, citric acid, secondary metabolites and sensory characteristics between healthy and HBLOJ, with, limonin and nomilin being 7.8 and 21.6 fold higher in HLBOJ than in healthy juice, respectively. Nonvolatile juice compounds were fractionated using fast centrifugal partition chromatography and semi preparative HPLC. Some fractions (7 out of 10) were described as bitter, but did not contain limonoids, polymethoxylated flavones or hesperidin, and, instead, were composed of hydroxycinnamates, suggesting these compounds might be involved with this sensory attribute. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png LWT - Food Science and Technology Elsevier

Active taste compounds in juice from oranges symptomatic for Huanglongbing (HLB) citrus greening disease

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0023-6438
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.lwt.2018.01.083
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Citrus greening disease, also known as Huanglongbing (HLB), compromises the quality of citrus fruit and juice, causing increased bitterness, metallic taste, astringency and a burning mouthfeel. The chemical basis responsible for these changes remains largely unknown other than the roles of the bitter limonoids, limonin and nomilin, and of flavonoids that may cause astringency. A combination of chemical and sensory analyses was used to identify bitter components in HBL-affected orange juice (HLBOJ), and compared with juice from healthy fruit. DNA analysis of the juice revealed that HLBOJ was well infected with the bacteria, with Ct value of 27 compared with 33 for the healthy juice. There were differences (at least P < 0.05) in pH, titratable acidity (TA), soluble solids content (SSC), SSC/TA, total sugars, citric acid, secondary metabolites and sensory characteristics between healthy and HBLOJ, with, limonin and nomilin being 7.8 and 21.6 fold higher in HLBOJ than in healthy juice, respectively. Nonvolatile juice compounds were fractionated using fast centrifugal partition chromatography and semi preparative HPLC. Some fractions (7 out of 10) were described as bitter, but did not contain limonoids, polymethoxylated flavones or hesperidin, and, instead, were composed of hydroxycinnamates, suggesting these compounds might be involved with this sensory attribute.

Journal

LWT - Food Science and TechnologyElsevier

Published: May 1, 2018

References

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