Active sites over CuO/CeO 2 and inverse CeO 2 /CuO catalysts for preferential CO oxidation

Active sites over CuO/CeO 2 and inverse CeO 2 /CuO catalysts for preferential CO oxidation 1 Introduction</h5> Hydrogen as a clean energy has attracted more and more attention due to the pressure from energy crisis, air pollution and climate change. However, the hydrogen feed that is produced from steam reforming followed by the water–gas shift (WGS) reaction contains 0.5–2 vol % CO, which can poison the Pt electrodes of the proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) [1–4] . Hence, it is essential to keep the CO concentration below 100 ppm level in the hydrogen entering the PEMFCs [5,6] . The preferential CO oxidation (CO-PROX) has been extensively accepted as one of the most cost-effective and straightforward techniques to achieve the acceptable CO concentration [4–7] .</P>CuO–CeO 2 catalysts, as an alternative to noble metal catalysts, show excellent catalytic performance for eliminating CO in the hydrogen-rich gasses [5–13] . In 2000 Martínez-Arias and co-worker [14] proposed that CuO/CeO 2 is more active than CuO/ZrCeO 4 for CO oxidation, which can be attributed to the higher redox activity of the copper–support interface sites on the catalyst. Avgouropoulos et al. [15] prepared a series of CuO–CeO 2 catalysts by a co-precipitation method, and found that they are very active and exceptionally selective for the CO reaction and exhibit http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Power Sources Elsevier

Active sites over CuO/CeO 2 and inverse CeO 2 /CuO catalysts for preferential CO oxidation

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0378-7753
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jpowsour.2014.01.098
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Hydrogen as a clean energy has attracted more and more attention due to the pressure from energy crisis, air pollution and climate change. However, the hydrogen feed that is produced from steam reforming followed by the water–gas shift (WGS) reaction contains 0.5–2 vol % CO, which can poison the Pt electrodes of the proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) [1–4] . Hence, it is essential to keep the CO concentration below 100 ppm level in the hydrogen entering the PEMFCs [5,6] . The preferential CO oxidation (CO-PROX) has been extensively accepted as one of the most cost-effective and straightforward techniques to achieve the acceptable CO concentration [4–7] .</P>CuO–CeO 2 catalysts, as an alternative to noble metal catalysts, show excellent catalytic performance for eliminating CO in the hydrogen-rich gasses [5–13] . In 2000 Martínez-Arias and co-worker [14] proposed that CuO/CeO 2 is more active than CuO/ZrCeO 4 for CO oxidation, which can be attributed to the higher redox activity of the copper–support interface sites on the catalyst. Avgouropoulos et al. [15] prepared a series of CuO–CeO 2 catalysts by a co-precipitation method, and found that they are very active and exceptionally selective for the CO reaction and exhibit

Journal

Journal of Power SourcesElsevier

Published: Jun 15, 2014

References

  • J. Phys. Chem. C.
    Gamarra, D.; Munuera, G.; Hungría, A.B.; Fernández-García, M.; Conesa, J.C.; Midgley, P.A.; Wang, X.Q.; Hanson, J.C.; Rodríguez, J.A.; Martínez-Arias, A.
  • J. Phys. Chem. C.
    Yang, Z.X.; He, B.L.; Lu, Z.S.; Hermansson, K.
  • J. Catal.
    Martínez-Arias, A.; Fernández-García, M.; Gálvez, O.; Coronado, J.M.; Anderson, J.A.; Conesa, J.C.; Soria, J.; Munuera, G.
  • J. Phys. Chem. C.
    Luo, M.F.; Song, Y.P.; Lu, J.Q.; Wang, X.Y.; Pu, Z.Y.

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