Academic procrastination of undergraduates: Low self-efficacy to self-regulate predicts higher levels of procrastination

Academic procrastination of undergraduates: Low self-efficacy to self-regulate predicts higher... This article reports two studies exploring the academic procrastination of 456 undergraduates. Study 1 explores the relationships among academic procrastination, self-regulation, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, and self-efficacy for self-regulation. Results reveal that although other self-variables are related to procrastination, self-efficacy for self-regulation is most predictive of procrastination tendencies. Study 2 examines academic and motivation characteristics of “negative procrastinators,” the undergraduates who are most adversely influenced by procrastination. The 25% of 195 participants in Study 2 who were classified as negative procrastinators had significantly lower GPAs, higher levels of daily and task procrastination, lower predicted and actual class grades, and lower self-efficacy for self-regulation. After controlling for GPA, daily procrastination and self-efficacy for self-regulation significantly predicted the negative impact of procrastination. The article concludes with a discussion of the importance that self-efficacy for self-regulation holds for procrastination research, and with suggestions for practitioners who work with students who are adversely affected by procrastination. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contemporary Educational Psychology Elsevier

Academic procrastination of undergraduates: Low self-efficacy to self-regulate predicts higher levels of procrastination

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0361-476x
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cedpsych.2007.07.001
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article reports two studies exploring the academic procrastination of 456 undergraduates. Study 1 explores the relationships among academic procrastination, self-regulation, academic self-efficacy, self-esteem, and self-efficacy for self-regulation. Results reveal that although other self-variables are related to procrastination, self-efficacy for self-regulation is most predictive of procrastination tendencies. Study 2 examines academic and motivation characteristics of “negative procrastinators,” the undergraduates who are most adversely influenced by procrastination. The 25% of 195 participants in Study 2 who were classified as negative procrastinators had significantly lower GPAs, higher levels of daily and task procrastination, lower predicted and actual class grades, and lower self-efficacy for self-regulation. After controlling for GPA, daily procrastination and self-efficacy for self-regulation significantly predicted the negative impact of procrastination. The article concludes with a discussion of the importance that self-efficacy for self-regulation holds for procrastination research, and with suggestions for practitioners who work with students who are adversely affected by procrastination.

Journal

Contemporary Educational PsychologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2008

References

  • Using predictions to learn about the self-efficacy of early adolescents with and without learning disabilities
    Klassen, R.M.
  • Cognitive test anxiety and academic performance
    Cassady, J.C.; Johnson, R.E.
  • Procrastination, temptations, and incentives: The struggle between the present and the future in procrastinators and the punctual
    Dewitte, S.; Schouwenburg, H.C.
  • Differential incidence of procrastination between blue-and white-collar workers
    Hammer, C.A.; Ferrari, J.R.
  • Procrastination in college students: The role of self-efficacy and anxiety
    Haycock, L.A.; McCarthy, P.; Skay, C.L.
  • Academic self-handicapping and achievement goals: A further examination
    Midgley, C.; Urdan, T.
  • Sources of academic and self-regulatory efficacy beliefs of entering middle school students
    Usher, E.L.; Pajares, F.

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