Abortion providers as stigmatizers: provider judgment and stereotyping of patients seeking abortion

Abortion providers as stigmatizers: provider judgment and stereotyping of patients seeking abortion Objectives</h5> Women who seek abortion are stigmatized. We consider the ways in which abortion providers may be stigmatizers.</P>Methods</h5> We conducted a multisite study of the Providers Share Workshop in 2010–2012. Providers Share is a five-session facilitated group workshop in which abortion providers meet to discuss their work. Sessions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using Dedoose. We identified themes using an iterative process. Here, we focus on providers judging or manifesting negative attitudes toward patients.</P>Results</h5> Seventy-nine abortion providers participated in 34 workshop sessions at seven U.S. abortion centers. Some providers expressed disapproval of patients who identified as pro-life or whose reasons for abortion they did not agree with (e.g., sex selection). Providers expressed frustration with women who had multiple abortions or relied on abortion, not contraception, for fertility control. These feelings were often tied to patients’ use of public funds for care. Conversely, providers also questioned the parenting ability of some patients — especially teens and those with addiction—and negatively judged decisions not to have an abortion. Providers also judged patients’ partners and the quality of their relationships. Many providers acknowledged their judgmental attitude and actively tried to prevent it from interfering with patient care.</P>Conclusions</h5> Abortion providers, like the population generally, judge women who seek abortion and subscribe to many of the same stereotypes of women that pro-choice advocates work to extinguish. However, workers actively resist judging. Further work is needed to determine if and how negative attitudes, and attempts to resist them, affect patient care.</P> http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Contraception Elsevier

Abortion providers as stigmatizers: provider judgment and stereotyping of patients seeking abortion

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0010-7824
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.contraception.2013.05.052
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Abstract

Objectives</h5> Women who seek abortion are stigmatized. We consider the ways in which abortion providers may be stigmatizers.</P>Methods</h5> We conducted a multisite study of the Providers Share Workshop in 2010–2012. Providers Share is a five-session facilitated group workshop in which abortion providers meet to discuss their work. Sessions were recorded, transcribed and analyzed using Dedoose. We identified themes using an iterative process. Here, we focus on providers judging or manifesting negative attitudes toward patients.</P>Results</h5> Seventy-nine abortion providers participated in 34 workshop sessions at seven U.S. abortion centers. Some providers expressed disapproval of patients who identified as pro-life or whose reasons for abortion they did not agree with (e.g., sex selection). Providers expressed frustration with women who had multiple abortions or relied on abortion, not contraception, for fertility control. These feelings were often tied to patients’ use of public funds for care. Conversely, providers also questioned the parenting ability of some patients — especially teens and those with addiction—and negatively judged decisions not to have an abortion. Providers also judged patients’ partners and the quality of their relationships. Many providers acknowledged their judgmental attitude and actively tried to prevent it from interfering with patient care.</P>Conclusions</h5> Abortion providers, like the population generally, judge women who seek abortion and subscribe to many of the same stereotypes of women that pro-choice advocates work to extinguish. However, workers actively resist judging. Further work is needed to determine if and how negative attitudes, and attempts to resist them, affect patient care.</P>

Journal

ContraceptionElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2013

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