A resilience-based framework for evaluating adaptive co-management: Linking ecology, economics and society in a complex world

A resilience-based framework for evaluating adaptive co-management: Linking ecology, economics... Adaptive co-management brings together collaborative and adaptive approaches in pursuit of sustainable resource use and social–ecological resilience. Enthusiasm for this management approach, however, is countered by recent critiques regarding outcomes. A lack of evidence from consistent evaluation of adaptive co-management further exacerbates this situation. This paper revisits the issue of evaluation in natural resource management and recasts it in light of complex adaptive systems thinking. An evaluative framework for adaptive co-management is developed which directs attention toward three broad components: ecosystem conditions, livelihood outcomes and process and institutional conditions. Scale-specific parameters are offered for each component to facilitate systematic learning from experience and encourage cross-site comparisons. Conclusions highlight the importance of systematically incorporating evaluation into the adaptive co-management process and recognize the challenge for resource agencies and researchers to shift from a conventional to a complex adaptive system perspective. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Economics Elsevier

A resilience-based framework for evaluating adaptive co-management: Linking ecology, economics and society in a complex world

Ecological Economics, Volume 61 (1) – Feb 15, 2007

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0921-8009
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecolecon.2006.09.025
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Adaptive co-management brings together collaborative and adaptive approaches in pursuit of sustainable resource use and social–ecological resilience. Enthusiasm for this management approach, however, is countered by recent critiques regarding outcomes. A lack of evidence from consistent evaluation of adaptive co-management further exacerbates this situation. This paper revisits the issue of evaluation in natural resource management and recasts it in light of complex adaptive systems thinking. An evaluative framework for adaptive co-management is developed which directs attention toward three broad components: ecosystem conditions, livelihood outcomes and process and institutional conditions. Scale-specific parameters are offered for each component to facilitate systematic learning from experience and encourage cross-site comparisons. Conclusions highlight the importance of systematically incorporating evaluation into the adaptive co-management process and recognize the challenge for resource agencies and researchers to shift from a conventional to a complex adaptive system perspective.

Journal

Ecological EconomicsElsevier

Published: Feb 15, 2007

References

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