A relaxation method for the energy and morphology of grain boundaries and interfaces

A relaxation method for the energy and morphology of grain boundaries and interfaces The energy density of crystal interfaces exhibits a characteristic “cusp” structure that renders it non-convex. Furthermore, crystal interfaces are often observed to be faceted, i.e., to be composed of flat facets in alternating directions. In this work, we forge a connection between these two observations by positing that the faceted morphology of crystal interfaces results from energy minimization. Specifically, we posit that the lack of convexity of the interfacial energy density drives the development of finely faceted microstructures and accounts for their geometry and morphology. We formulate the problem as a generalized minimal surface problem couched in a geometric measure-theoretical framework. We then show that the effective, or relaxed, interfacial energy density, with all possible interfacial morphologies accounted for, corresponds to the convexification of the bare or unrelaxed interfacial energy density, and that the requisite convexification can be attained by means of a faceting construction. We validate the approach by means of comparisons with experiment and atomistic simulations including symmetric and asymmetric tilt boundaries in face-centered cubic (FCC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals. By comparison with simulated and experimental data, we show that this simple model of interfacial energy combined with a general microstructure construction based on convexification is able to replicate complex interfacial morphologies, including thermally induced morphological transitions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids Elsevier

A relaxation method for the energy and morphology of grain boundaries and interfaces

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/a-relaxation-method-for-the-energy-and-morphology-of-grain-boundaries-7ML8SQWFJ9
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0022-5096
eISSN
1873-4782
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.jmps.2015.11.007
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The energy density of crystal interfaces exhibits a characteristic “cusp” structure that renders it non-convex. Furthermore, crystal interfaces are often observed to be faceted, i.e., to be composed of flat facets in alternating directions. In this work, we forge a connection between these two observations by positing that the faceted morphology of crystal interfaces results from energy minimization. Specifically, we posit that the lack of convexity of the interfacial energy density drives the development of finely faceted microstructures and accounts for their geometry and morphology. We formulate the problem as a generalized minimal surface problem couched in a geometric measure-theoretical framework. We then show that the effective, or relaxed, interfacial energy density, with all possible interfacial morphologies accounted for, corresponds to the convexification of the bare or unrelaxed interfacial energy density, and that the requisite convexification can be attained by means of a faceting construction. We validate the approach by means of comparisons with experiment and atomistic simulations including symmetric and asymmetric tilt boundaries in face-centered cubic (FCC) and body-centered cubic (BCC) crystals. By comparison with simulated and experimental data, we show that this simple model of interfacial energy combined with a general microstructure construction based on convexification is able to replicate complex interfacial morphologies, including thermally induced morphological transitions.

Journal

Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of SolidsElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2016

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

Monthly Plan

  • Read unlimited articles
  • Personalized recommendations
  • No expiration
  • Print 20 pages per month
  • 20% off on PDF purchases
  • Organize your research
  • Get updates on your journals and topic searches

$49/month

Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial

Best Deal — 39% off

Annual Plan

  • All the features of the Professional Plan, but for 39% off!
  • Billed annually
  • No expiration
  • For the normal price of 10 articles elsewhere, you get one full year of unlimited access to articles.

$588

$360/year

billed annually
Start Free Trial

14-day Free Trial