A quick and simple method for the identification of meat species and meat products by PCR assay

A quick and simple method for the identification of meat species and meat products by PCR assay The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to identify six meats (cattle, pig, chicken, sheep, goat and horse) as raw materials for products. By mixing seven primers in appropriate ratios, species-specific DNA fragments could be identified by only one multiplex PCR. A forward primer was designed on a conserved DNA sequence in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, and reverse primers on species-specific DNA sequences for each species. PCR primers were designed to give different length fragments from the six meats. The products showed species-specific DNA fragments of 157, 227, 274, 331, 398 and 439 bp from goat, chicken, cattle, sheep, pig and horse meats, respectively. Identification is possible by electrophoresis of PCR products. Cattle, pig, chicken, sheep and goat fragments were amplified from cooked meat heated at 100 or 120°C for 30 min, but horse DNA fragments could not be detected from the 120°C sample. Detection limits of the DNA samples were 0.25 ng for all meats. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Meat Science Elsevier

A quick and simple method for the identification of meat species and meat products by PCR assay

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0309-1740
DOI
10.1016/S0309-1740(98)00112-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was applied to identify six meats (cattle, pig, chicken, sheep, goat and horse) as raw materials for products. By mixing seven primers in appropriate ratios, species-specific DNA fragments could be identified by only one multiplex PCR. A forward primer was designed on a conserved DNA sequence in the mitochondrial cytochrome b gene, and reverse primers on species-specific DNA sequences for each species. PCR primers were designed to give different length fragments from the six meats. The products showed species-specific DNA fragments of 157, 227, 274, 331, 398 and 439 bp from goat, chicken, cattle, sheep, pig and horse meats, respectively. Identification is possible by electrophoresis of PCR products. Cattle, pig, chicken, sheep and goat fragments were amplified from cooked meat heated at 100 or 120°C for 30 min, but horse DNA fragments could not be detected from the 120°C sample. Detection limits of the DNA samples were 0.25 ng for all meats.

Journal

Meat ScienceElsevier

Published: Feb 1, 1999

References

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