A novel use of calcium aluminate cements for recycling waste foundry sand (WFS)

A novel use of calcium aluminate cements for recycling waste foundry sand (WFS) 1 Introduction</h5> Foundry sand is a by-product of ferrous and nonferrous metal casting industries, in which sand is used as a molding material. When the sand can no longer be reused, it becomes a hazardous material according to European regulations as quoted by Alonso-Santurde et al. [1] , since it can contain heavy metals and different pollutants [2,3] . The usual fate of this sand – several MT per year – is to be landfilled after a previous process of solidification/stabilization. Owing to high landfilling costs and environmental concerns, some researchers have reported other management alternatives for these polluted WFS, such as subbases, soils, ceramics, controlled-low-strength materials and concretes [4–8] . In these last two cases, WFS can be used to partially replace normal sand. Different issues related to this last point have been addressed: the effect of WFS on workability and compressive strengths, the freezing-thawing resistance of the concretes and the replacement levels [9–11] . In general, only low replacement levels (below 20%) guarantee acceptable performance in the final concrete [5] .</P>All the preexisting work shows two common characteristics: on the one hand, ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was used as the binding material; on the other hand, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Construction and Building Materials Elsevier

A novel use of calcium aluminate cements for recycling waste foundry sand (WFS)

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0950-0618
eISSN
1879-0526
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.conbuildmat.2013.06.071
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Foundry sand is a by-product of ferrous and nonferrous metal casting industries, in which sand is used as a molding material. When the sand can no longer be reused, it becomes a hazardous material according to European regulations as quoted by Alonso-Santurde et al. [1] , since it can contain heavy metals and different pollutants [2,3] . The usual fate of this sand – several MT per year – is to be landfilled after a previous process of solidification/stabilization. Owing to high landfilling costs and environmental concerns, some researchers have reported other management alternatives for these polluted WFS, such as subbases, soils, ceramics, controlled-low-strength materials and concretes [4–8] . In these last two cases, WFS can be used to partially replace normal sand. Different issues related to this last point have been addressed: the effect of WFS on workability and compressive strengths, the freezing-thawing resistance of the concretes and the replacement levels [9–11] . In general, only low replacement levels (below 20%) guarantee acceptable performance in the final concrete [5] .</P>All the preexisting work shows two common characteristics: on the one hand, ordinary Portland cement (OPC) was used as the binding material; on the other hand,

Journal

Construction and Building MaterialsElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2013

References

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