A note on the economics of biological invasions

A note on the economics of biological invasions Despite the rising concern over the economic costs of biological invasions, no general modelling approach of these costs has been developed. The purpose of this note is to develop such a framework, and to demonstrate how conventional bioeconomic models of interspecific competition, such as the predator–prey model, are essentially special cases. A model of the economic consequences of the biological invasion must therefore be based on two principles. First, the economic impacts imposed by the invader will depend on the exact nature of the interspecific interaction, and secondly, the correct measure of these impacts should be based on a comparison of the ex post and ex ante invasion scenarios. An important consideration is determining whether the spread, or dispersal, of the invading species in turn affects the location and movement of the resident species in the pre-existing habitat, or whether the interspecific competition occurs solely in the same habitat area without diffusive movement of either species, or finally, whether both species dispersal and some form of interspecific competition might occur as a result of an invasion. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Economics Elsevier

A note on the economics of biological invasions

Ecological Economics, Volume 39 (2) – Nov 1, 2001

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0921-8009
DOI
10.1016/S0921-8009(01)00239-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Despite the rising concern over the economic costs of biological invasions, no general modelling approach of these costs has been developed. The purpose of this note is to develop such a framework, and to demonstrate how conventional bioeconomic models of interspecific competition, such as the predator–prey model, are essentially special cases. A model of the economic consequences of the biological invasion must therefore be based on two principles. First, the economic impacts imposed by the invader will depend on the exact nature of the interspecific interaction, and secondly, the correct measure of these impacts should be based on a comparison of the ex post and ex ante invasion scenarios. An important consideration is determining whether the spread, or dispersal, of the invading species in turn affects the location and movement of the resident species in the pre-existing habitat, or whether the interspecific competition occurs solely in the same habitat area without diffusive movement of either species, or finally, whether both species dispersal and some form of interspecific competition might occur as a result of an invasion.

Journal

Ecological EconomicsElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2001

References

  • Biological Invasions
    Williamson, M.
  • Pests: sustained harvest versus eradication
    Wilman, E.A.

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