A new strategy for producing antibacterial textile surfaces using silver nanoparticles

A new strategy for producing antibacterial textile surfaces using silver nanoparticles 1 Introduction</h5> Bacterial infection is a potential risk to human life. Many antibacterial agents such as quaternary ammonium salts, phenols, peroxides and halogen-releasing compounds have been so far used to decrease the risk of dermal, oral or breathing. Even if some of these agents are not possible to apply to foods, textiles, filters, etc. due to their toxicity and poor efficiency, silver or silver ions are known as powerful antibacterial agents because they are effective against 650 disease-causing organisms in the body, even at low concentrations [1–3] and relatively nontoxic for human cells [4] . Therefore, silver in various forms such as metallic, ionic and nanoparticle has attracted great interest for last two decades and are ideally suited for a wide range of applications in research and industrial applications. One of the applications of silver nanoparticles is to enhance antibacterial properties of textiles materials. All types of textiles, such as synthetic or natural fibers, have no resistance to bacteria and/or pathogens. Consequently, many works involving silver nanoparticles have been reported to enhance antibacterial activity of textile fabrics. For example, Duran et al. [5] incorporated silver nanoparticles synthesized by fungi on cotton fabrics, and demonstrated that they show good http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Chemical Engineering Journal Elsevier

A new strategy for producing antibacterial textile surfaces using silver nanoparticles

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
1385-8947
eISSN
1873-3212
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.cej.2013.05.018
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Bacterial infection is a potential risk to human life. Many antibacterial agents such as quaternary ammonium salts, phenols, peroxides and halogen-releasing compounds have been so far used to decrease the risk of dermal, oral or breathing. Even if some of these agents are not possible to apply to foods, textiles, filters, etc. due to their toxicity and poor efficiency, silver or silver ions are known as powerful antibacterial agents because they are effective against 650 disease-causing organisms in the body, even at low concentrations [1–3] and relatively nontoxic for human cells [4] . Therefore, silver in various forms such as metallic, ionic and nanoparticle has attracted great interest for last two decades and are ideally suited for a wide range of applications in research and industrial applications. One of the applications of silver nanoparticles is to enhance antibacterial properties of textiles materials. All types of textiles, such as synthetic or natural fibers, have no resistance to bacteria and/or pathogens. Consequently, many works involving silver nanoparticles have been reported to enhance antibacterial activity of textile fabrics. For example, Duran et al. [5] incorporated silver nanoparticles synthesized by fungi on cotton fabrics, and demonstrated that they show good

Journal

Chemical Engineering JournalElsevier

Published: Jul 15, 2013

References

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