A new proposed mechanism of action for gastric bypass surgery: Air hypothesis

A new proposed mechanism of action for gastric bypass surgery: Air hypothesis Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is one of the most effective treatments for obesity and type II diabetes. RYGB was originally believed to work by mechanically restricting caloric intake or causing macronutrient malabsorption. However, such mechanical effects play no role in the remarkable efficacy of gastric bypass. Instead, mounting evidence shows that altered neuroendocrine signaling is responsible for the weight reducing effects of RYGB. The exact mechanism of this surgical response is still a mystery. Here, we propose that RYGB leads to weight loss primarily by inducing a functional shift in the gut microbiome, manifested by a relative expansion of aerobic bacteria numbers in the colon. We point to compelling evidence that gastric bypass changes the function of the microbiome by disrupting intestinal gas homeostasis, causing excessive transit of swallowed air (oxygen) into the colon. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Medical Hypotheses Elsevier

A new proposed mechanism of action for gastric bypass surgery: Air hypothesis

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 The Author
ISSN
0306-9877
eISSN
1532-2777
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.mehy.2017.08.012
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery is one of the most effective treatments for obesity and type II diabetes. RYGB was originally believed to work by mechanically restricting caloric intake or causing macronutrient malabsorption. However, such mechanical effects play no role in the remarkable efficacy of gastric bypass. Instead, mounting evidence shows that altered neuroendocrine signaling is responsible for the weight reducing effects of RYGB. The exact mechanism of this surgical response is still a mystery. Here, we propose that RYGB leads to weight loss primarily by inducing a functional shift in the gut microbiome, manifested by a relative expansion of aerobic bacteria numbers in the colon. We point to compelling evidence that gastric bypass changes the function of the microbiome by disrupting intestinal gas homeostasis, causing excessive transit of swallowed air (oxygen) into the colon.

Journal

Medical HypothesesElsevier

Published: Sep 1, 2017

References

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