A neuronal model of attentional spotlight: parietal guiding the temporal

A neuronal model of attentional spotlight: parietal guiding the temporal Recent studies have reported an attentional feedback that highlights neural responses as early along the visual pathway as the primary visual cortex. Such filtering would help in reducing informational overload and in performing serial visual search by directing attention to individual locations in the visual field. The magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) subdivisions are two of the major parallel pathways in primate vision that originate in the retina and carry distinctly different types of information. The M pathway, characterized by its high sensitivity to movement and to low contrast stimuli, forms the predominant visual input into the dorsal, parietal stream in the neocortex. The P inputs, characterized by their colour selectivity and higher spatial resolution, are channeled mainly into the ventral, temporal stream. It is proposed that the attentional spotlight originates in the dorsal stream and helps in serially searching the field for conjunction of the relevant target features in the temporal stream, effectively performing a gating function on all visual inputs. This model predicts that a defect limited to the magnocellular or the dorsal pathway can lead to widespread deficits in cognitive abilities, including those functions that are largely based on parvocellular information. For example, the model provides a neural mechanism linking a peripheral defect in the magnocellular pathway to the reading disabilities in dyslexia. Even though there has been strong evidence for a magnocellular deficit in dyslexia, the paradox has been that the cognitive disability seems to be related to P pathway function. The scheme proposed here shows how M input may be vital for controlling sequential attention during reading. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Brain Research Reviews Elsevier

A neuronal model of attentional spotlight: parietal guiding the temporal

Brain Research Reviews, Volume 30 (1) – Jul 1, 1999

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/a-neuronal-model-of-attentional-spotlight-parietal-guiding-the-ytqA0j533K
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0165-0173
DOI
10.1016/S0165-0173(99)00005-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Recent studies have reported an attentional feedback that highlights neural responses as early along the visual pathway as the primary visual cortex. Such filtering would help in reducing informational overload and in performing serial visual search by directing attention to individual locations in the visual field. The magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) subdivisions are two of the major parallel pathways in primate vision that originate in the retina and carry distinctly different types of information. The M pathway, characterized by its high sensitivity to movement and to low contrast stimuli, forms the predominant visual input into the dorsal, parietal stream in the neocortex. The P inputs, characterized by their colour selectivity and higher spatial resolution, are channeled mainly into the ventral, temporal stream. It is proposed that the attentional spotlight originates in the dorsal stream and helps in serially searching the field for conjunction of the relevant target features in the temporal stream, effectively performing a gating function on all visual inputs. This model predicts that a defect limited to the magnocellular or the dorsal pathway can lead to widespread deficits in cognitive abilities, including those functions that are largely based on parvocellular information. For example, the model provides a neural mechanism linking a peripheral defect in the magnocellular pathway to the reading disabilities in dyslexia. Even though there has been strong evidence for a magnocellular deficit in dyslexia, the paradox has been that the cognitive disability seems to be related to P pathway function. The scheme proposed here shows how M input may be vital for controlling sequential attention during reading.

Journal

Brain Research ReviewsElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 1999

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off