A Method for Establishing the Handedness of Biological Macromolecules

A Method for Establishing the Handedness of Biological Macromolecules When biological macromolecules are imaged in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), their inherent handedness is lost because the three-dimensional (3D) structure is projected onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane, and identical 2D projections can be made from either 3D enantiomer. Nevertheless, tilt experiments in the TEM can be used to determine handedness. These experiments have been performed successfully on negatively stained specimens. More recently, the method was applied to unstained, frozen-hydrated specimens imaged by means of cryoelectron microscopy (cryoTEM) methods. Tilt experiments involve recording two micrographs of the same particles at different tilt angles, computing enantiomeric reconstructions from particle images in one micrograph, predicting orientations of corresponding particles in the second micrograph, and comparing model projections with particle images in the second micrograph. In principle, this procedure can be used to determine the handedness of any biological macromolecule imaged by cryoTEM, provided the enantiomeric reconstructions are distinguishable. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Structural Biology Elsevier

A Method for Establishing the Handedness of Biological Macromolecules

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 Academic Press
ISSN
1047-8477
eISSN
1095-8657
DOI
10.1006/jsbi.1997.3896
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

When biological macromolecules are imaged in the transmission electron microscope (TEM), their inherent handedness is lost because the three-dimensional (3D) structure is projected onto a two-dimensional (2D) plane, and identical 2D projections can be made from either 3D enantiomer. Nevertheless, tilt experiments in the TEM can be used to determine handedness. These experiments have been performed successfully on negatively stained specimens. More recently, the method was applied to unstained, frozen-hydrated specimens imaged by means of cryoelectron microscopy (cryoTEM) methods. Tilt experiments involve recording two micrographs of the same particles at different tilt angles, computing enantiomeric reconstructions from particle images in one micrograph, predicting orientations of corresponding particles in the second micrograph, and comparing model projections with particle images in the second micrograph. In principle, this procedure can be used to determine the handedness of any biological macromolecule imaged by cryoTEM, provided the enantiomeric reconstructions are distinguishable.

Journal

Journal of Structural BiologyElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 1997

References

  • A model-based approach for determining orientations of biological macromolecules imaged by cryoelectron microscopy
    Baker, T.S.; Cheng, R.H.
  • Conserved features in papillomavirus and polyomavirus capsids
    Belnap, D.M.; Olson, N.H.; Cladel, N.M.; Newcomb, W.W.; Brown, J.C.; Kreider, J.W.; Christensen, N.D.; Baker, T.S.
  • Early steps in reovirus infection are associated with dramatic changes in supramolecular structure and protein conformation: Analysis of virions and subviral particles by cryoelectron microscopy and image reconstruction
    Dryden, K.A.; Wang, G.; Yeager, M.; Nibert, M.L.; Coombs, K.M.; Furlong, D.B.; Fields, B.N.; Baker, T.S.
  • Atomic model of plant light-harvesting complex by electron crystallography
    Kühlbrandt, W.; Wang, D.N.; Fujiyoshi, Y.

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