A method for determining the treatment dosage of drinking water treatment residuals for effective phosphorus immobilization in sediments

A method for determining the treatment dosage of drinking water treatment residuals for effective... 1 Introduction</h5> Excessive phosphorus (P) in water bodies (e.g. lakes, rivers, etc.) can lead to eutrophication, and internal loading from P-enriched sediments is one of the primary origins of excessive P ( Haggard and Soerens, 2006; Cyr et al., 2009; Jin et al., 2013 ). At present, in situ P immobilization is a comparatively new technology for remediating P-enriched sediments ( Paller and Knox, 2010 ). In situ P immobilization utilizes chemically reactive materials to sequester P in non-labile forms within sediments, thereby reducing internal P loading in water bodies ( Yuan et al., 2009; Egemose et al., 2010 ). The selection of materials with high P sorption capacity and low environmental toxicity is critical to the successful application of in situ P immobilization technology ( Paller and Knox, 2010 ). Materials such as Fe and Al salts are often used due to their high P immobilization capacities ( Hansen et al., 2003; Reitzel et al., 2005, 2006 ). Despite their effectiveness, a low-cost alternative to Fe and Al salts is sought to overcome financial constraints to widespread use, particularly where the application of a large quantity of P immobilizing material is required.</P>Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) are http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecological Engineering Elsevier

A method for determining the treatment dosage of drinking water treatment residuals for effective phosphorus immobilization in sediments

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V.
ISSN
0925-8574
eISSN
1872-6992
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ecoleng.2013.09.045
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> Excessive phosphorus (P) in water bodies (e.g. lakes, rivers, etc.) can lead to eutrophication, and internal loading from P-enriched sediments is one of the primary origins of excessive P ( Haggard and Soerens, 2006; Cyr et al., 2009; Jin et al., 2013 ). At present, in situ P immobilization is a comparatively new technology for remediating P-enriched sediments ( Paller and Knox, 2010 ). In situ P immobilization utilizes chemically reactive materials to sequester P in non-labile forms within sediments, thereby reducing internal P loading in water bodies ( Yuan et al., 2009; Egemose et al., 2010 ). The selection of materials with high P sorption capacity and low environmental toxicity is critical to the successful application of in situ P immobilization technology ( Paller and Knox, 2010 ). Materials such as Fe and Al salts are often used due to their high P immobilization capacities ( Hansen et al., 2003; Reitzel et al., 2005, 2006 ). Despite their effectiveness, a low-cost alternative to Fe and Al salts is sought to overcome financial constraints to widespread use, particularly where the application of a large quantity of P immobilizing material is required.</P>Drinking water treatment residuals (WTRs) are

Journal

Ecological EngineeringElsevier

Published: Nov 1, 2013

References

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