A mechanistic review on GNAO1-associated movement disorder

A mechanistic review on GNAO1-associated movement disorder Mutations in the GNAO1 gene cause a complex constellation of neurological disorders including epilepsy, developmental delay, and movement disorders. GNAO1 encodes Gαo, the α subunit of Go, a member of the Gi/o family of heterotrimeric G protein signal transducers. Go is the most abundant membrane protein in the mammalian central nervous system and plays major roles in synaptic neurotransmission and neurodevelopment. GNAO1 mutations were first reported in early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 17 (EIEE17) but are also associated with a more common syndrome termed neurodevelopmental disorder with involuntary movements (NEDIM). Here we review a mechanistic model in which loss-of-function (LOF) GNAO1 alleles cause epilepsy and gain-of-function (GOF) alleles are primarily associated with movement disorders. We also develop a signaling framework related to cyclic AMP (cAMP), synaptic vesicle release, and neural development and discuss gene mutations perturbing those mechanisms in a range of genetic movement disorders. Finally, we analyze clinical reports of patients carrying GNAO1 mutations with respect to their symptom onset and discuss pharmacological/surgical treatments in the context of our mechanistic model. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Neurobiology of Disease Elsevier

A mechanistic review on GNAO1-associated movement disorder

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc.
ISSN
0969-9961
eISSN
1095-953X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.nbd.2018.05.005
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Mutations in the GNAO1 gene cause a complex constellation of neurological disorders including epilepsy, developmental delay, and movement disorders. GNAO1 encodes Gαo, the α subunit of Go, a member of the Gi/o family of heterotrimeric G protein signal transducers. Go is the most abundant membrane protein in the mammalian central nervous system and plays major roles in synaptic neurotransmission and neurodevelopment. GNAO1 mutations were first reported in early infantile epileptic encephalopathy 17 (EIEE17) but are also associated with a more common syndrome termed neurodevelopmental disorder with involuntary movements (NEDIM). Here we review a mechanistic model in which loss-of-function (LOF) GNAO1 alleles cause epilepsy and gain-of-function (GOF) alleles are primarily associated with movement disorders. We also develop a signaling framework related to cyclic AMP (cAMP), synaptic vesicle release, and neural development and discuss gene mutations perturbing those mechanisms in a range of genetic movement disorders. Finally, we analyze clinical reports of patients carrying GNAO1 mutations with respect to their symptom onset and discuss pharmacological/surgical treatments in the context of our mechanistic model.

Journal

Neurobiology of DiseaseElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2018

References

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