A hybrid modelling approach to develop scenarios for China's carbon dioxide emissions to 2050

A hybrid modelling approach to develop scenarios for China's carbon dioxide emissions to 2050 1 Introduction</h5> China's 2009 CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion were about 7.2 Gt, having more than doubled since 2000 ( EIA, 2011 ) 1 1 This figure differs from IEA (2011) which shows emissions at 6.9 GtCO 2 . Neither figure includes emissions from land use change or industrial process (mainly cement) emissions, but the EIA (2011) figures do include emissions from petroleum use in bunkering, which are not included in the IEA (2011) figure. . Two years (2003 and 2004) saw annual increases in emissions of greater than 15%, driven by a rapid expansion of heavy industrial sectors ( IEA, 2010a ). In the absence of specific and additional measures, these emissions are projected to continue to rise with China's continued economic development, in some scenarios representing nearly 30% of global emissions by 2050 ( IEA, 2010b ). This means that the future course of China's CO 2 emissions is of critical importance for climate change mitigation. The goal of this paper is to outline scenarios which represent a fundamental transformation in China's energy system to 2050, highlighting the major technologies that in combination provide this transformation, and the policy implications of developing and deploying http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Energy Policy Elsevier

A hybrid modelling approach to develop scenarios for China's carbon dioxide emissions to 2050

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/a-hybrid-modelling-approach-to-develop-scenarios-for-china-s-carbon-o2IawH6bH0
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0301-4215
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.enpol.2013.04.022
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

1 Introduction</h5> China's 2009 CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion were about 7.2 Gt, having more than doubled since 2000 ( EIA, 2011 ) 1 1 This figure differs from IEA (2011) which shows emissions at 6.9 GtCO 2 . Neither figure includes emissions from land use change or industrial process (mainly cement) emissions, but the EIA (2011) figures do include emissions from petroleum use in bunkering, which are not included in the IEA (2011) figure. . Two years (2003 and 2004) saw annual increases in emissions of greater than 15%, driven by a rapid expansion of heavy industrial sectors ( IEA, 2010a ). In the absence of specific and additional measures, these emissions are projected to continue to rise with China's continued economic development, in some scenarios representing nearly 30% of global emissions by 2050 ( IEA, 2010b ). This means that the future course of China's CO 2 emissions is of critical importance for climate change mitigation. The goal of this paper is to outline scenarios which represent a fundamental transformation in China's energy system to 2050, highlighting the major technologies that in combination provide this transformation, and the policy implications of developing and deploying

Journal

Energy PolicyElsevier

Published: Aug 1, 2013

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off