A Holocene climatic record from arid northwestern China

A Holocene climatic record from arid northwestern China The history of climatic changes during the interval 8500–3000 cal. yr B.P. has been reconstructed from stratigraphical and chronological studies and the results of Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Total Inorganic Carbon (TIC), element composition, pollen, and stable isotope analyses of a section along the Hongshui River, in the southern Tengger Desert, NW China. The record suggests that from 8450 (bottom of the studied section) to 7500 yr B.P., the climate was characterized by instability. From 7500 to 5070 yr B.P., the climatic conditions improved and can be divided into two parts: a warm–humid spell between 7290 and 6380 yr B.P., during which the average temperature was 3–4°C higher than that of today, and a warm–dry spell lasting from 5950 to 5720 yr B.P. The climate deteriorated between 6380 and 5950 yr B.P. From 5720 to 5070 yr B.P., the temperature decreased, but humidity increased. An abrupt temperature drop occurred between 5340 and 5290 yr B.P. that indicated the decline of the warmer and humid Mid-Holocene climate. From 5070 yr B.P. onward, the climate oscillated significantly and there were three large temperature decreases coinciding with high mountain glacier advances between 5070–4670 yr B.P., 4300–3740 yr B.P. and 3410–3230 yr B.P. (top of the section), respectively. The climatic fluctuations recorded in the southern Tengger Desert appear in-phase with climatic changes recognized in the Tibetan Plateau, suggesting that the period between 7290 and 6380 yr B.P. was the most warm–humid spell. One extremely dry event occurred at ca. 3000 yr B.P., and subsequently the fluvial–lacustrine depositional process terminated and wind action prevailed in the area; both of these features can be attributed to the rapid strengthening and weakening of the summer monsoon circulation, which are closely connected with global changes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology" Elsevier

A Holocene climatic record from arid northwestern China

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/a-holocene-climatic-record-from-arid-northwestern-china-nXmCnqqzOo
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.
ISSN
0031-0182
eISSN
1872-616X
DOI
10.1016/S0031-0182(00)00139-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The history of climatic changes during the interval 8500–3000 cal. yr B.P. has been reconstructed from stratigraphical and chronological studies and the results of Total Organic Carbon (TOC), Total Inorganic Carbon (TIC), element composition, pollen, and stable isotope analyses of a section along the Hongshui River, in the southern Tengger Desert, NW China. The record suggests that from 8450 (bottom of the studied section) to 7500 yr B.P., the climate was characterized by instability. From 7500 to 5070 yr B.P., the climatic conditions improved and can be divided into two parts: a warm–humid spell between 7290 and 6380 yr B.P., during which the average temperature was 3–4°C higher than that of today, and a warm–dry spell lasting from 5950 to 5720 yr B.P. The climate deteriorated between 6380 and 5950 yr B.P. From 5720 to 5070 yr B.P., the temperature decreased, but humidity increased. An abrupt temperature drop occurred between 5340 and 5290 yr B.P. that indicated the decline of the warmer and humid Mid-Holocene climate. From 5070 yr B.P. onward, the climate oscillated significantly and there were three large temperature decreases coinciding with high mountain glacier advances between 5070–4670 yr B.P., 4300–3740 yr B.P. and 3410–3230 yr B.P. (top of the section), respectively. The climatic fluctuations recorded in the southern Tengger Desert appear in-phase with climatic changes recognized in the Tibetan Plateau, suggesting that the period between 7290 and 6380 yr B.P. was the most warm–humid spell. One extremely dry event occurred at ca. 3000 yr B.P., and subsequently the fluvial–lacustrine depositional process terminated and wind action prevailed in the area; both of these features can be attributed to the rapid strengthening and weakening of the summer monsoon circulation, which are closely connected with global changes.

Journal

"Palaeogeography, Palaeoclimatology, Palaeoecology"Elsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2000

References

  • Palaeoclimatic interpretation of a topographic profile across middle Holocene regressive shorelines of Longmu Co (Western Tibet)
    Avouac, J.-P.; Dobremez, J.-F.; Bourjot, L.
  • Holocene environmental changes in Bangong Co basin (Western Tibet). Part 3. Biogenic remains
    Fan, H.; Gasse, F.; Huc, A.; Li, Y.; Sifeddine, A.; Soulie-Märsche, I.
  • Holocene environmental changes in Bangong Co basin (western Tibet). Part 4. Discussion and conclusions
    Gasse, F.; Fontes, J.-Ch.; Van Campo, E.; Wei, K.
  • A late Pleistocene–Holocene lacustrine record from Lake Manas, Zunggar (northern Xinjiang, western China)
    Rhodes, T.E.; Gasse, F.; Lin, R.; Fontes, J.-Ch.; Wei, K.; Bertrand, P.; Gibert, E.; Melieres, F.; Tucholka, P.; Wang, Z.; Cheng, Z.
  • Holocene environmental changes in Bangong Co Basin (western Tibet). Part 2. The pollen record
    Van Campo, E.; Cour, P.; Hang, S.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off