A hidden program in Drosophila peripheral neurogenesis revealed: fundamental principles underlying sensory organ diversity

A hidden program in Drosophila peripheral neurogenesis revealed: fundamental principles... How is cell fate diversity reliably achieved during development? Insect sensory organs have been a favorable model system for investigating this question for over 100 years. They are constructed using defined cell lineages that generate a maximum of cell diversity with a minimum number of cell divisions, and display tremendous variety in their morphologies, constituent cell types, and functions. An unexpected realization of the past 5 years is that very diverse sensory organs in Drosophila are produced by astonishingly similar cell lineages, and that their diversity can be largely attributed to only a small repertoire of developmental processes. These include changes in terminal cell differentiation, cell death, cell proliferation, cell recruitment, cell–cell interactions, and asymmetric segregation of cell fate determinants during mitosis. We propose that most Drosophila sensory organs are built from an archetypal lineage, and we speculate about how this stereotyped pattern of cell divisions may have been built during evolution. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Developmental Biology Elsevier

A hidden program in Drosophila peripheral neurogenesis revealed: fundamental principles underlying sensory organ diversity

Developmental Biology, Volume 269 (1) – May 1, 2004

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Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0012-1606
eISSN
1095-564X
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.ydbio.2004.01.032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

How is cell fate diversity reliably achieved during development? Insect sensory organs have been a favorable model system for investigating this question for over 100 years. They are constructed using defined cell lineages that generate a maximum of cell diversity with a minimum number of cell divisions, and display tremendous variety in their morphologies, constituent cell types, and functions. An unexpected realization of the past 5 years is that very diverse sensory organs in Drosophila are produced by astonishingly similar cell lineages, and that their diversity can be largely attributed to only a small repertoire of developmental processes. These include changes in terminal cell differentiation, cell death, cell proliferation, cell recruitment, cell–cell interactions, and asymmetric segregation of cell fate determinants during mitosis. We propose that most Drosophila sensory organs are built from an archetypal lineage, and we speculate about how this stereotyped pattern of cell divisions may have been built during evolution.

Journal

Developmental BiologyElsevier

Published: May 1, 2004

References

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