A comparison of temporal integration in children with a specific reading disability and normal readers

A comparison of temporal integration in children with a specific reading disability and normal... Previous research has suggested that whereas some techniques show that subjects with a specific reading disability (SRD) have greater visible persistence than controls, a temporal integration of form technique does not. It has been suggested that the failure of the temporal integration task to show a difference results from the spatial separation between stimuli used in the technique. In this study SRD and control subjects were compared on a new version of a temporal integration task, under two conditions varying the spatial separation of elements in the display. It was predicted that there would be no difference between groups when spatial separation was large, but that the SRD subjects would show greater visible persistence at small separations. Neither prediction was confirmed, denying previous explanations of why the temporal integration task does not discriminate between groups. Analysis of errors showed that the result was not due to inattention nor to a general deficit on the part of the SRD subjects. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Vision Research Elsevier

A comparison of temporal integration in children with a specific reading disability and normal readers

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/a-comparison-of-temporal-integration-in-children-with-a-specific-w7DumS24M0
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1995 Elsevier Science Ltd
ISSN
0042-6989
eISSN
1878-5646
D.O.I.
10.1016/0042-6989(94)00278-T
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Previous research has suggested that whereas some techniques show that subjects with a specific reading disability (SRD) have greater visible persistence than controls, a temporal integration of form technique does not. It has been suggested that the failure of the temporal integration task to show a difference results from the spatial separation between stimuli used in the technique. In this study SRD and control subjects were compared on a new version of a temporal integration task, under two conditions varying the spatial separation of elements in the display. It was predicted that there would be no difference between groups when spatial separation was large, but that the SRD subjects would show greater visible persistence at small separations. Neither prediction was confirmed, denying previous explanations of why the temporal integration task does not discriminate between groups. Analysis of errors showed that the result was not due to inattention nor to a general deficit on the part of the SRD subjects.

Journal

Vision ResearchElsevier

Published: Jul 1, 1995

References

  • The Neale analysis of reading ability
    Neale, M.D.
  • Visual processing of straight lines in dyslexic and normal children
    O'Beill, G.; Stanley, G.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off