A biophysical process-based estimate of global land surface evaporation using satellite and ancillary data I. Model description and comparison with observations

A biophysical process-based estimate of global land surface evaporation using satellite and... A biophysical process-band model is used to estimate transpiration, soil evaporation and interception over the global land surface for a 24-month period (January 1987 to December 1988). The model parameters are determined from published records, and their geographical distribution has been prescribed according to land use and land cover data. Satellite observations are used to obtain fractional vegetation cover, isothermal net and photosynthetically active radiation, air temperature and vapor pressure deficit. Precipitation and friction velocity are derived as blended products (disaggregated and assimilated data). The calculated seasonal and geographical variations of evaporation, net radiation and soil moisture are in good agreement with field observations, catchment water balance data, and atmospheric water budget analysis; explained variances being greater than 75%. Uncertainties in the estimated evaporation are about 15 and 20%, respectively, for annual and monthly values. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Hydrology Elsevier

A biophysical process-based estimate of global land surface evaporation using satellite and ancillary data I. Model description and comparison with observations

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/a-biophysical-process-based-estimate-of-global-land-surface-8HnWwnzEw1
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0022-1694
eISSN
1879-2707
D.O.I.
10.1016/S0022-1694(97)00147-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A biophysical process-band model is used to estimate transpiration, soil evaporation and interception over the global land surface for a 24-month period (January 1987 to December 1988). The model parameters are determined from published records, and their geographical distribution has been prescribed according to land use and land cover data. Satellite observations are used to obtain fractional vegetation cover, isothermal net and photosynthetically active radiation, air temperature and vapor pressure deficit. Precipitation and friction velocity are derived as blended products (disaggregated and assimilated data). The calculated seasonal and geographical variations of evaporation, net radiation and soil moisture are in good agreement with field observations, catchment water balance data, and atmospheric water budget analysis; explained variances being greater than 75%. Uncertainties in the estimated evaporation are about 15 and 20%, respectively, for annual and monthly values.

Journal

Journal of HydrologyElsevier

Published: Mar 1, 1998

References

  • Observations of climate, albedo, and surface radiation over cleared and undisturbed Amazonian forest
    Bastable, H.G.; Shuttleworth, W.J.; Dallarosa, R.L.G.; Fish, G.; Nobre, C.A.
  • Cabauw data for validation of land surface parameterization schemes
    Beljaars, A.C.M.; Bosveld, F.C.
  • Evapotranspiration from Douglas fir stands exposed to soil water deficits
    Black, T.A.
  • On the variability of the net longwave radiation at the ocean surface
    Fung, I.Y.; Harrison, D.E.; Lacis, A.A.
  • A global analysis of root distribution for terrestrial biomes
    Jackson, R.B.; Canadell, J.; Ehleringer, J.R.; Mooney, H.A.; Sala, O.E.; Schluze, E.-D.
  • Real evapotranspiration and transpiration through a tropical rain forest in central Amazonia as estimated by the water balance method
    Leopoldo, P.R.; Franken, W.K.; Villa Nove, N.A.
  • A critical appraisal of a combined stomatal-photosynthesis model for C 3 plants
    Leuning, R.
  • A study of evapotranspiration from a Douglas fir forest using the energy balance approach
    McNaughton, K.G.; Black, T.A.
  • Photosynthetic climate in selected regions during the northern hemisphere growing season
    Pinker, R.T.; Laszlo, I.; Miskolczi, F.
  • Effect of vegetation density on the parameterization of scalar roughness to estimate spatially distributed sensible heat flux
    Qualls, R.J.; Brutsaert, W.
  • Revisiting the degree-day method for snowmelt computations
    Rango, A.; Martinec, J.
  • Model for predicting evaporation from a row crop with incomplete cover
    Ritchie, J.T.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off