24-Epibrassinolide alleviates organic pollutants-retarded root elongation by promoting redox homeostasis and secondary metabolism in Cucumis sativus L

24-Epibrassinolide alleviates organic pollutants-retarded root elongation by promoting redox... Environmental pollution by organic pollutants (OPs) has become a global concern due to its detrimental effects on the environment and human health. As plants are used to remediate contaminated sites, understanding the responses of plants to various OPs and fortification of plant tolerance are of great significance. In this work, we studied the biochemical and molecular responses of cucumber plants to three well-known OPs, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, chlorpyrifos and oxytetracycline in the absence or presence of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), a potent regulator of plant growth and stress tolerance. The results showed that the selected three OPs retarded root elongation; however, the phytotoxic effects of OPs were attenuated by exogenous EBR. OPs induced accumulations of both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in root tips and resulted in an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, an indicator of membrane lipid peroxidation. Exogenous EBR reduced accumulations of H2O2, NO and MDA in the roots by increasing the expression of antioxidant and detoxification genes and the activities of the corresponding enzymes. Intriguingly, EBR not only promoted the activities of glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase, but also increased the content of reduced glutathione without altering the content of oxidized glutathione, which resulted in a reduced redox state under OPs stress. Furthermore, EBR increased the free radical scavenging capacity, flavonoid content and the activity and transcription of secondary metabolism related enzymes. Our results suggest that EBR treatment may fortify secondary metabolism to enhance antioxidant capacity in response to OPs treatment, which might have potential implication in phytoremediation of OPs. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Pollution Elsevier

24-Epibrassinolide alleviates organic pollutants-retarded root elongation by promoting redox homeostasis and secondary metabolism in Cucumis sativus L

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/24-epibrassinolide-alleviates-organic-pollutants-retarded-root-lbVazgz7W8
Publisher
Elsevier
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd
ISSN
0269-7491
D.O.I.
10.1016/j.envpol.2017.07.076
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Environmental pollution by organic pollutants (OPs) has become a global concern due to its detrimental effects on the environment and human health. As plants are used to remediate contaminated sites, understanding the responses of plants to various OPs and fortification of plant tolerance are of great significance. In this work, we studied the biochemical and molecular responses of cucumber plants to three well-known OPs, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol, chlorpyrifos and oxytetracycline in the absence or presence of 24-epibrassinolide (EBR), a potent regulator of plant growth and stress tolerance. The results showed that the selected three OPs retarded root elongation; however, the phytotoxic effects of OPs were attenuated by exogenous EBR. OPs induced accumulations of both hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and nitric oxide (NO) in root tips and resulted in an increased malondialdehyde (MDA) content, an indicator of membrane lipid peroxidation. Exogenous EBR reduced accumulations of H2O2, NO and MDA in the roots by increasing the expression of antioxidant and detoxification genes and the activities of the corresponding enzymes. Intriguingly, EBR not only promoted the activities of glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase, but also increased the content of reduced glutathione without altering the content of oxidized glutathione, which resulted in a reduced redox state under OPs stress. Furthermore, EBR increased the free radical scavenging capacity, flavonoid content and the activity and transcription of secondary metabolism related enzymes. Our results suggest that EBR treatment may fortify secondary metabolism to enhance antioxidant capacity in response to OPs treatment, which might have potential implication in phytoremediation of OPs.

Journal

Environmental PollutionElsevier

Published: Oct 1, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off