10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2005.03.026

10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2005.03.026 1 <h5>Introduction</h5> Predictive modeling of species geographic distributions based on the environmental conditions of sites of known occurrence constitutes an important technique in analytical biology, with applications in conservation and reserve planning, ecology, evolution, epidemiology, invasive-species management and other fields (Corsi et al., 1999; Peterson and Shaw, 2003; Peterson et al., 1999; Scott et al., 2002; Welk et al., 2002; Yom-Tov and Kadmon, 1998) . Sometimes both presence and absence occurrence data are available for the development of models, in which case general-purpose statistical methods can be used (for an overview of the variety of techniques currently in use, see Corsi et al., 2000; Elith, 2002; Guisan and Zimmerman, 2000; Scott et al., 2002 ). However, while vast stores of presence-only data exist (particularly in natural history museums and herbaria), absence data are rarely available, especially for poorly sampled tropical regions where modeling potentially has the most value for conservation (Anderson et al., 2002; Ponder et al., 2001; Soberón, 1999) . In addition, even when absence data are available, they may be of questionable value in many situations (Anderson et al., 2003) . Modeling techniques that require only presence data are therefore extremely valuable (Graham et al., 2004) http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

10.1016/j.ecolmodel.2005.03.026

Elsevier — Jun 11, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/elsevier/10-1016-j-ecolmodel-2005-03-026-PC8uV93foa
Datasource
Elsevier

Abstract

1 <h5>Introduction</h5> Predictive modeling of species geographic distributions based on the environmental conditions of sites of known occurrence constitutes an important technique in analytical biology, with applications in conservation and reserve planning, ecology, evolution, epidemiology, invasive-species management and other fields (Corsi et al., 1999; Peterson and Shaw, 2003; Peterson et al., 1999; Scott et al., 2002; Welk et al., 2002; Yom-Tov and Kadmon, 1998) . Sometimes both presence and absence occurrence data are available for the development of models, in which case general-purpose statistical methods can be used (for an overview of the variety of techniques currently in use, see Corsi et al., 2000; Elith, 2002; Guisan and Zimmerman, 2000; Scott et al., 2002 ). However, while vast stores of presence-only data exist (particularly in natural history museums and herbaria), absence data are rarely available, especially for poorly sampled tropical regions where modeling potentially has the most value for conservation (Anderson et al., 2002; Ponder et al., 2001; Soberón, 1999) . In addition, even when absence data are available, they may be of questionable value in many situations (Anderson et al., 2003) . Modeling techniques that require only presence data are therefore extremely valuable (Graham et al., 2004)

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off