10.1006/appe.2001.0406

10.1006/appe.2001.0406 Appetite (2001) 37, 15±26 doi:10.1006/appe.2001.0406, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on R. Poveya, B.Wellensb and M.Connerc a c Centre for Health Psychology, Staffordshire University; bCentre for Occupational and Health Psychology,Cardiff University; School of Psychology,University of Leeds (Received 5 October 2000, revision 28 March 2001, accepted in revised form 3 May 2001) Vegetarianism within the U.K. is growing in popularity, with the current estimate of 7% of the population eating a vegetarian diet. This study examined differences between the attitudes and beliefs of four dietary groups (meat eaters, meat avoiders, vegetarians and vegans) and the extent to which attitudes influenced intentions to follow each diet. In addition, the role of attitudinal ambivalence as a moderator variable was examined. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 111 respondents (25 meat eaters, 26 meat avoiders, 34 vegetarians, 26 vegans). In general, predictions were supported, in that respondents displayed most positive attitudes and beliefs towards their own diets, and most negative attitudes and beliefs towards the diet most different form their own. Regression analyses showed that, as predicted by the Theory of Planned Behaviour, attitudes, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control were significant predictors of intention to follow each diet (apart from the vegetarian diet, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png

10.1006/appe.2001.0406

Elsevier — Jun 11, 2020

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Abstract

Appetite (2001) 37, 15±26 doi:10.1006/appe.2001.0406, available online at http://www.idealibrary.com on R. Poveya, B.Wellensb and M.Connerc a c Centre for Health Psychology, Staffordshire University; bCentre for Occupational and Health Psychology,Cardiff University; School of Psychology,University of Leeds (Received 5 October 2000, revision 28 March 2001, accepted in revised form 3 May 2001) Vegetarianism within the U.K. is growing in popularity, with the current estimate of 7% of the population eating a vegetarian diet. This study examined differences between the attitudes and beliefs of four dietary groups (meat eaters, meat avoiders, vegetarians and vegans) and the extent to which attitudes influenced intentions to follow each diet. In addition, the role of attitudinal ambivalence as a moderator variable was examined. Completed questionnaires were obtained from 111 respondents (25 meat eaters, 26 meat avoiders, 34 vegetarians, 26 vegans). In general, predictions were supported, in that respondents displayed most positive attitudes and beliefs towards their own diets, and most negative attitudes and beliefs towards the diet most different form their own. Regression analyses showed that, as predicted by the Theory of Planned Behaviour, attitudes, subjective norm and perceived behavioural control were significant predictors of intention to follow each diet (apart from the vegetarian diet,

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