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‘To receive guests with kindness’: Symbols of Hospitality, Nobility and Diplomacy in Alexander Seton's Designed Landscape at Fyvie Castle

‘To receive guests with kindness’: Symbols of Hospitality, Nobility and Diplomacy in Alexander... Shannon Marguerite Fraser An ongoing programme of research into the nature of the late sixteenth-/early seventeenth-century designed landscape around Fyvie Castle, Aberdeenshire is beginning to reveal the grand vision of its creator Alexander Seton, Lord Fyvie. This paper seeks to explore some of the symbolic narratives Seton embedded within the formal landscape he designed at Fyvie in the years around 1600, which was ultimately swept away by a Picturesque impetus in the late eighteenth century. I n t ro du c t i on Fyvie Castle is a royal foundation of the late twelfth or early thirteenth century. Today it is probably most famous for the architectural achievement of its great south front, the fabric of which embraces elements dating from the medieval period to the early twentieth century, but which is still largely the conception of Alexander Seton, Lord Fyvie (1555­1622) (Figure 1). The National Trust for Scotland initiated a major programme of research in 2010, aimed at casting light on Seton's elaboration of Fyvie Castle and its surroundings as an integral entity. This ongoing project has included three seasons of geophysical survey (led by Susan Ovenden of Rose Geophysical Consultants) and archaeological excavation (directed by Alison http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

‘To receive guests with kindness’: Symbols of Hospitality, Nobility and Diplomacy in Alexander Seton's Designed Landscape at Fyvie Castle

Architectural Heritage , Volume 26 (1): 121 – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2015
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2015.0071
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Shannon Marguerite Fraser An ongoing programme of research into the nature of the late sixteenth-/early seventeenth-century designed landscape around Fyvie Castle, Aberdeenshire is beginning to reveal the grand vision of its creator Alexander Seton, Lord Fyvie. This paper seeks to explore some of the symbolic narratives Seton embedded within the formal landscape he designed at Fyvie in the years around 1600, which was ultimately swept away by a Picturesque impetus in the late eighteenth century. I n t ro du c t i on Fyvie Castle is a royal foundation of the late twelfth or early thirteenth century. Today it is probably most famous for the architectural achievement of its great south front, the fabric of which embraces elements dating from the medieval period to the early twentieth century, but which is still largely the conception of Alexander Seton, Lord Fyvie (1555­1622) (Figure 1). The National Trust for Scotland initiated a major programme of research in 2010, aimed at casting light on Seton's elaboration of Fyvie Castle and its surroundings as an integral entity. This ongoing project has included three seasons of geophysical survey (led by Susan Ovenden of Rose Geophysical Consultants) and archaeological excavation (directed by Alison

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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