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‘The Rest is Silence’: Psychogeography, Soundscape and Nostalgia in Pat Collins' Silence

‘The Rest is Silence’: Psychogeography, Soundscape and Nostalgia in Pat Collins' Silence Guy Debord defines the term psychogeography as `the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organised or not, on the emotions and behaviour of individuals' (Debord 1955: 23). Similar to the belief of psychogeographers that the geography of an environment has a psychological effect on the human mind, proponents of acoustic ecology such as R. Murray Schafer hold that humans are affected by the sound of the environment in which they find themselves. Further to this, they examine the extent to which soundscapes can be shaped by human behaviour. Recently a body of Irish films has emerged that directly engages with the Irish soundscape and landscape on a psychogeographical level. Rather than using landscape as a physical space for the locus of action, these representations of the Irish landscape allow for an engagement with the aesthetic effects of the geographical landscape as a reflection of the psychological states of the protagonists. Bearing this in mind, this article examines how Silence (Collins 2012) arguably demonstrates the most overt and conscious incursion into this area to date. It specifically interrogates how the filmic representation of the The New Soundtrack 5.2 (2015): 121­132 DOI: 10.3366/sound.2015.0074 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png The New Soundtrack Edinburgh University Press

‘The Rest is Silence’: Psychogeography, Soundscape and Nostalgia in Pat Collins' Silence

The New Soundtrack , Volume 5 (2): 121 – Sep 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press and the Contributors
Subject
Articles; Film, Media and Cultural Studies
ISSN
2042-8855
eISSN
2042-8863
DOI
10.3366/sound.2015.0074
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Guy Debord defines the term psychogeography as `the study of the precise laws and specific effects of the geographical environment, consciously organised or not, on the emotions and behaviour of individuals' (Debord 1955: 23). Similar to the belief of psychogeographers that the geography of an environment has a psychological effect on the human mind, proponents of acoustic ecology such as R. Murray Schafer hold that humans are affected by the sound of the environment in which they find themselves. Further to this, they examine the extent to which soundscapes can be shaped by human behaviour. Recently a body of Irish films has emerged that directly engages with the Irish soundscape and landscape on a psychogeographical level. Rather than using landscape as a physical space for the locus of action, these representations of the Irish landscape allow for an engagement with the aesthetic effects of the geographical landscape as a reflection of the psychological states of the protagonists. Bearing this in mind, this article examines how Silence (Collins 2012) arguably demonstrates the most overt and conscious incursion into this area to date. It specifically interrogates how the filmic representation of the The New Soundtrack 5.2 (2015): 121­132 DOI: 10.3366/sound.2015.0074

Journal

The New SoundtrackEdinburgh University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2015

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