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The High Price of Heaven – The 6 th Earl of Glasgow and the College of the Holy Spirit on the Isle of Cumbrae

The High Price of Heaven – The 6 th Earl of Glasgow and the College of the Holy Spirit on the... Michael Moss On a wild and stormy Whitsunday, 8 June 1851, the Chapel of the College of the Holy Spirit was opened for worship with the Provost, the Reverend George Cosby White, late warden of the House of Charity St Anne’s Soho, as celebrant. He was a close friend and collaborator of Henry Manning, who had recently converted to Roman Catholicism and was to become a Cardinal. The resident Canons Reverend A. Wilson and the Reverend F. H. Freeth of University College Durham assisted. Celebrations continued for the next two days, with several Episcopal clergy coming to visit the spectacular new buildings that had been designed by the architect William Butterfield. The College, which was not yet complete, had taken three years to build and was modelled on an Augustinian community of missionary priests and, as the name implies, a place where potential candidates for ordination could be taught. By June 1851 the church and the south wing with accommodation for a Provost and clergy, along with three senior and six junior students, had been finished. The other wing, which was completed in October, was to accommodate sixteen boy choristers. The buildings were reportedly in the ‘second pointed http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

The High Price of Heaven – The 6 th Earl of Glasgow and the College of the Holy Spirit on the Isle of Cumbrae

Architectural Heritage , Volume 22 (1): 77 – Nov 1, 2011

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2011
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2011.0019
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Michael Moss On a wild and stormy Whitsunday, 8 June 1851, the Chapel of the College of the Holy Spirit was opened for worship with the Provost, the Reverend George Cosby White, late warden of the House of Charity St Anne’s Soho, as celebrant. He was a close friend and collaborator of Henry Manning, who had recently converted to Roman Catholicism and was to become a Cardinal. The resident Canons Reverend A. Wilson and the Reverend F. H. Freeth of University College Durham assisted. Celebrations continued for the next two days, with several Episcopal clergy coming to visit the spectacular new buildings that had been designed by the architect William Butterfield. The College, which was not yet complete, had taken three years to build and was modelled on an Augustinian community of missionary priests and, as the name implies, a place where potential candidates for ordination could be taught. By June 1851 the church and the south wing with accommodation for a Provost and clergy, along with three senior and six junior students, had been finished. The other wing, which was completed in October, was to accommodate sixteen boy choristers. The buildings were reportedly in the ‘second pointed

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2011

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