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The Case that was Holmwood, Cathcart, Glasgow

The Case that was Holmwood, Cathcart, Glasgow Audrey Gardner W h a t W e l l i n g t o n s a i d a t Waterloo comes to mind when recalling the tussle for Holmwood – ‘It was a close run thing.’ It seems obvious now that Holmwood, the villa by Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson, should be in public ownership but it did not seem so between 1990 and 1993. Owned by a teaching order, Sisters of Our Lady of the Missions, it had been run as a school for around 25 years. Then, in 1990, the nuns sold the entire site to a developer, the Carvill Group Ltd, subject to the purchaser obtaining planning permission. At this time, as explained in an article in The Telegraph of 23 September 1992 (at the height of the controversy), ‘Thomson is neglected even in his own city. Many of his works have been destroyed. Others are in a poor state of repair.’ It took the arrival of Gavin Stamp from south of the border to change this state of affairs. He duly founded the Alexander Thomson Society in 1991. By July of that year the developers were preparing to make a planning application for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

The Case that was Holmwood, Cathcart, Glasgow

Architectural Heritage , Volume 17 (1): 135 – Nov 1, 2006

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2006.17.1.135
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Audrey Gardner W h a t W e l l i n g t o n s a i d a t Waterloo comes to mind when recalling the tussle for Holmwood – ‘It was a close run thing.’ It seems obvious now that Holmwood, the villa by Alexander ‘Greek’ Thomson, should be in public ownership but it did not seem so between 1990 and 1993. Owned by a teaching order, Sisters of Our Lady of the Missions, it had been run as a school for around 25 years. Then, in 1990, the nuns sold the entire site to a developer, the Carvill Group Ltd, subject to the purchaser obtaining planning permission. At this time, as explained in an article in The Telegraph of 23 September 1992 (at the height of the controversy), ‘Thomson is neglected even in his own city. Many of his works have been destroyed. Others are in a poor state of repair.’ It took the arrival of Gavin Stamp from south of the border to change this state of affairs. He duly founded the Alexander Thomson Society in 1991. By July of that year the developers were preparing to make a planning application for

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2006

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