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Nigel Coates, Guide to Ecstacity

Nigel Coates, Guide to Ecstacity  Nigel Coates, Guide to Ecstacity, Laurence King Publishing, ,     . £. Can the architectural profession genuinely embrace the concept of buildings feeling good rather than merely looking good? Nigel Coates’ brash new book is a kaleidoscopic journey, an adrenaline-pumping, helter-skelter ride crowded with overlapping narratives, entwined bodies and iconic city fragments. Ecstacity is a hefty encyclopaedic tome which rambles and repeats itself but is like no other architecture book you will read this year. Coates is currently professor at the Royal College of Art and his adopted city, London, is the quintessence of ‘Ecstacity’. As always, the city acts as a crucible for new ideas and clashing cultures; a melting pot to nurture the cross-fertilisation of innovative thinking. Certainly Coates’ quirky manifesto offers a new, resolutely twenty-first century way of looking at architecture. Ecstacity endeavours to overturn our ingrained prejudices and posit a new promiscuity, overturning the Ancien Regime and promoting a rampant catholicism. It seems that everything is up for grabs here; the world (Nigel’s world) is processed through a souped-up blender and re-presented across  pages. One can discern a plethora of influences (ranging from Jean Cocteau to Calvin Klein and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Nigel Coates, Guide to Ecstacity

Architectural Heritage , Volume 15 (1): 139 – Nov 1, 2004

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2004.15.1.139
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

 Nigel Coates, Guide to Ecstacity, Laurence King Publishing, ,     . £. Can the architectural profession genuinely embrace the concept of buildings feeling good rather than merely looking good? Nigel Coates’ brash new book is a kaleidoscopic journey, an adrenaline-pumping, helter-skelter ride crowded with overlapping narratives, entwined bodies and iconic city fragments. Ecstacity is a hefty encyclopaedic tome which rambles and repeats itself but is like no other architecture book you will read this year. Coates is currently professor at the Royal College of Art and his adopted city, London, is the quintessence of ‘Ecstacity’. As always, the city acts as a crucible for new ideas and clashing cultures; a melting pot to nurture the cross-fertilisation of innovative thinking. Certainly Coates’ quirky manifesto offers a new, resolutely twenty-first century way of looking at architecture. Ecstacity endeavours to overturn our ingrained prejudices and posit a new promiscuity, overturning the Ancien Regime and promoting a rampant catholicism. It seems that everything is up for grabs here; the world (Nigel’s world) is processed through a souped-up blender and re-presented across  pages. One can discern a plethora of influences (ranging from Jean Cocteau to Calvin Klein and

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2004

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