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MORRIS, P. A. Van Ingen & Van Ingen: artists in taxidermy

MORRIS, P. A. Van Ingen & Van Ingen: artists in taxidermy BOOK REVIEWS appropriately illustrated, and the books ends with an index to names only, not subjects, which is a pity. However, the names include those referred to in the extensive footnotes, which redresses the balance slightly. All the chapters are interesting in their own right, and there are many original and important ideas here, though it is unfortunate that one or two authors use a great many words to make their points; these chapters could usefully have been edited down. Among the examples of historical collectors are the familiar names of Darwin, John and William Hunter and so on (though, surprisingly, Hans Sloane is nowhere mentioned), but there are many lesser known figures whose importance lies in their variety of reasons for making collections. Natural historians will find much to stimulate their interest in these unconventional issues, and this seems the main importance of the volume. One hopes that it will lead to a new direction of study, in the same way that Impey and MacGregor’s (1985) book did in the reinterpretation of encyclopaedic collecting. In places, the individualism of the authors leads to near-parochialism; to read that most of the Linnaean collections “were sold to a Mr. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Natural History Edinburgh University Press

MORRIS, P. A. Van Ingen & Van Ingen: artists in taxidermy

Archives of Natural History , Volume 34 (2): 364 – Oct 1, 2007

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
0260-9541
eISSN
1755-6260
DOI
10.3366/anh.2007.34.2.364
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS appropriately illustrated, and the books ends with an index to names only, not subjects, which is a pity. However, the names include those referred to in the extensive footnotes, which redresses the balance slightly. All the chapters are interesting in their own right, and there are many original and important ideas here, though it is unfortunate that one or two authors use a great many words to make their points; these chapters could usefully have been edited down. Among the examples of historical collectors are the familiar names of Darwin, John and William Hunter and so on (though, surprisingly, Hans Sloane is nowhere mentioned), but there are many lesser known figures whose importance lies in their variety of reasons for making collections. Natural historians will find much to stimulate their interest in these unconventional issues, and this seems the main importance of the volume. One hopes that it will lead to a new direction of study, in the same way that Impey and MacGregor’s (1985) book did in the reinterpretation of encyclopaedic collecting. In places, the individualism of the authors leads to near-parochialism; to read that most of the Linnaean collections “were sold to a Mr.

Journal

Archives of Natural HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Oct 1, 2007

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