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Introduction: The Virtual, the Actual and the Intensive: Contentions, Reflections and Interpretations

Introduction: The Virtual, the Actual and the Intensive: Contentions, Reflections and... Dale Clisby Deakin University Sean Bowden Deakin University As Deleuze scholars, or as philosophers seeking to apply his philosophical insights in various domains, we sometimes speak and write as though Deleuze's concepts were well understood. When we examine the literature, however, we find a surprising lack of consensus regarding the sense of his core concepts and the relations between them ­ even those as central as the virtual, the actual and the intensive. To take the relation between the virtual and the actual as a significant example, we find on the one hand that a number of Deleuze's readers and critics understand him to assert a kind of ontological `priority' of the virtual over the actual, whereby the virtual asserts a one-way power of creation vis-à-vis the actual. Badiou and Hallward both argue for such a view, but so too does a sympathetic reader such as Ansell-Pearson (Badiou 2000: 43­5; Hallward 2006: 28, 37, 47; Ansell-Pearson 2002: 99, 111). On the other hand, and in direct contrast with this view, a number of commentators understand there to be a relation of ontological influence between the domain of virtuality and that of actuality. Smith, for example, argues that `the http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Deleuze Studies Edinburgh University Press

Introduction: The Virtual, the Actual and the Intensive: Contentions, Reflections and Interpretations

Deleuze Studies , Volume 11 (2): 153 – May 1, 2017

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Edinburgh University Press
Subject
Philosophy and Religion
ISSN
1750-2241
eISSN
1755-1684
DOI
10.3366/dls.2017.0259
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Dale Clisby Deakin University Sean Bowden Deakin University As Deleuze scholars, or as philosophers seeking to apply his philosophical insights in various domains, we sometimes speak and write as though Deleuze's concepts were well understood. When we examine the literature, however, we find a surprising lack of consensus regarding the sense of his core concepts and the relations between them ­ even those as central as the virtual, the actual and the intensive. To take the relation between the virtual and the actual as a significant example, we find on the one hand that a number of Deleuze's readers and critics understand him to assert a kind of ontological `priority' of the virtual over the actual, whereby the virtual asserts a one-way power of creation vis-à-vis the actual. Badiou and Hallward both argue for such a view, but so too does a sympathetic reader such as Ansell-Pearson (Badiou 2000: 43­5; Hallward 2006: 28, 37, 47; Ansell-Pearson 2002: 99, 111). On the other hand, and in direct contrast with this view, a number of commentators understand there to be a relation of ontological influence between the domain of virtuality and that of actuality. Smith, for example, argues that `the

Journal

Deleuze StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: May 1, 2017

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