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From du Cerceau to du Cerceau: Scottish Aristocratic Architectural Taste, c .1570– c .1750

From du Cerceau to du Cerceau: Scottish Aristocratic Architectural Taste, c .1570– c .1750 The 1990 exhibition curated by Charles McKean and Deborah Howard was the decisive victory in a war waged for a century between those arguing that French influence was pervasive in the elite architecture of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Scotland and those claiming it was overwhelmingly a home-grown phenomenon.1 This, together with Charles's subsequent publications and especially The Scottish Chateau, demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that there was extensive French influence.2 This article extends this debate by focusing on the influence of the printed pattern books of Jacques Androuet du Cerceau (fl. c.1545­c.1585) on one house, Careston Castle, five miles west of Brechin in Angus, and goes on to suggest that their influence pervaded Scottish architecture much more widely than hitherto realised, only fading after 1745.3 MacGibbon and Ross, writing c.1890, dismissed the notion of widespread French influence asserting that: `The only exceptions are Stirling and Falkland, where we believe French workmen were employed. These two buildings however stand alone, both in point of time and design, and are the exceptions which prove the rule.'4 This remained the orthodoxy for a century, despite two publications by W. Douglas Simpson, casting doubt on it. One argued that the builders http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

From du Cerceau to du Cerceau: Scottish Aristocratic Architectural Taste, c .1570– c .1750

Architectural Heritage , Volume 26 (1): 55 – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2015
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2015.0067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The 1990 exhibition curated by Charles McKean and Deborah Howard was the decisive victory in a war waged for a century between those arguing that French influence was pervasive in the elite architecture of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries in Scotland and those claiming it was overwhelmingly a home-grown phenomenon.1 This, together with Charles's subsequent publications and especially The Scottish Chateau, demonstrated beyond reasonable doubt that there was extensive French influence.2 This article extends this debate by focusing on the influence of the printed pattern books of Jacques Androuet du Cerceau (fl. c.1545­c.1585) on one house, Careston Castle, five miles west of Brechin in Angus, and goes on to suggest that their influence pervaded Scottish architecture much more widely than hitherto realised, only fading after 1745.3 MacGibbon and Ross, writing c.1890, dismissed the notion of widespread French influence asserting that: `The only exceptions are Stirling and Falkland, where we believe French workmen were employed. These two buildings however stand alone, both in point of time and design, and are the exceptions which prove the rule.'4 This remained the orthodoxy for a century, despite two publications by W. Douglas Simpson, casting doubt on it. One argued that the builders

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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