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From Beyond the Devil's Beef Tub: A Note from Dumfries and Galloway

From Beyond the Devil's Beef Tub: A Note from Dumfries and Galloway Antony C. Wolffe T h e S c o t t i s h G e o r g i a n S o c i e t y ( s g s ) was founded in Edinburgh 50 years ago in response to Edinburgh University proposals for demolishing George Square and rebuilding modern university facilities. The building industry at that time was recovering from the loss of architects and skilled tradesmen during the war years. In South-West Scotland, local government, in those days, was in the hands of the county councils of Dumfriesshire, the Stewartry and Wigtownshire, the large burgh of Dumfries and 15 small burgh councils, each a housing authority in its own right. With staff shortages, some of the early post-war housing schemes were based on pre-war designs made available by the rias, and housing layouts were prepared by consultants like Frank Mears from Edinburgh, who was also planning consultant to Dumfries Town Council and Dumfriesshire County Council at the time when planning committees were set up under the 1948 Planning Act to establish development control. The Planning Act introduced the control of buildings of architectural and historic interest. The Scottish Development Department, responsible for http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

From Beyond the Devil's Beef Tub: A Note from Dumfries and Galloway

Architectural Heritage , Volume 17 (1): 121 – Nov 1, 2006

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2006.17.1.121
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Antony C. Wolffe T h e S c o t t i s h G e o r g i a n S o c i e t y ( s g s ) was founded in Edinburgh 50 years ago in response to Edinburgh University proposals for demolishing George Square and rebuilding modern university facilities. The building industry at that time was recovering from the loss of architects and skilled tradesmen during the war years. In South-West Scotland, local government, in those days, was in the hands of the county councils of Dumfriesshire, the Stewartry and Wigtownshire, the large burgh of Dumfries and 15 small burgh councils, each a housing authority in its own right. With staff shortages, some of the early post-war housing schemes were based on pre-war designs made available by the rias, and housing layouts were prepared by consultants like Frank Mears from Edinburgh, who was also planning consultant to Dumfries Town Council and Dumfriesshire County Council at the time when planning committees were set up under the 1948 Planning Act to establish development control. The Planning Act introduced the control of buildings of architectural and historic interest. The Scottish Development Department, responsible for

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2006

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