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‘For friendship and conversation’: Martial Scotland's Domestic Castles

‘For friendship and conversation’: Martial Scotland's Domestic Castles Aonghus MacKechnie `You and I have a fundamental disagreement,' Charles told me, when I last saw him. This was concerning the military potential of the buildings described in his book The Scottish Chateau. I have taken that `fundamental disagreement' as my topic, and I present it as a tribute to Charles's always-challenging intellect. It is a privilege to write an article he would have delighted to cross-examine me on, and I'm sorry he's not here to do that. Disagree with him or not: his ideas continue to shape today's thinking. Sir Walter Dundas, in . . . 1623 . . . erected and adorned, as an ornament of his country and family . . . as also an amusing recreation for his friends, guests, and visitors, this fountain in the form of a castle, this dial with its retinue of goddesses, and this garden with its buildings, walls, and quadrangular walks, surmounted with stones piled on high, rocks having been on all sides deeply cut, which inconveniently covered the ground. / Whosoever . . . comest hither, we, so many half-fiendish spectres, are placed here . . . lest any meddling, evil-disposed person, should put forth his hand http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

‘For friendship and conversation’: Martial Scotland's Domestic Castles

Architectural Heritage , Volume 26 (1): 5 – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2015
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2015.0064
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Aonghus MacKechnie `You and I have a fundamental disagreement,' Charles told me, when I last saw him. This was concerning the military potential of the buildings described in his book The Scottish Chateau. I have taken that `fundamental disagreement' as my topic, and I present it as a tribute to Charles's always-challenging intellect. It is a privilege to write an article he would have delighted to cross-examine me on, and I'm sorry he's not here to do that. Disagree with him or not: his ideas continue to shape today's thinking. Sir Walter Dundas, in . . . 1623 . . . erected and adorned, as an ornament of his country and family . . . as also an amusing recreation for his friends, guests, and visitors, this fountain in the form of a castle, this dial with its retinue of goddesses, and this garden with its buildings, walls, and quadrangular walks, surmounted with stones piled on high, rocks having been on all sides deeply cut, which inconveniently covered the ground. / Whosoever . . . comest hither, we, so many half-fiendish spectres, are placed here . . . lest any meddling, evil-disposed person, should put forth his hand

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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