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Editorial

Editorial library history, Vol. 24 No. 4, December, 2008, 251 Alistair Black This issue of Library History is the third, and last, part of the published proceedings of the conference ‘Making Connections Between Library, Book, Reading and Information History’, held at Leeds Metropolitan University in June 2007. It is also my last issue as editor of the journal, having taken over from the long-serving Keith Manley just about four years ago. I am grateful for the support I have received during my time as editor from staff at the journal’s publisher, Maney, as well as from members of the editorial board, from those who have kindly given up their time to referee articles and from those who have volunteered to review books. I am especially grateful to those who have contributed articles, the subject matter of which has given Library History a truly international fl avour. My thanks also go to Boyd Rayward for his good work as North American editor. I leave Library History in the very capable hands of Toni Weller, who will take the journal into a new era and new territory, under a new name. Mirroring the name of the body that controls the journal (the Library and Information History Group) and that of the Group’s parent organisation (the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), from March 2009 (Volume 25, Number 1) the title of the journal will change to Library and Information History. The new editor, author of a recent book titled Information History (Chandos, 2008), will no doubt in due course set out the reasons for the change of tack. Suffi ce to say here that the study of, fi rstly, the way people, organizations, and institutions have in the past managed and used information, and secondly, of the links that have existed between library services and librarianship on the one hand, and information services, infrastructure, and occupations on the other, have been under-represented activities in the fi eld of history. Library and Information History will hopefully rectify this defi ciency. © CILIP 2008 DOI 10.1179/174581608X384131 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Library History Edinburgh University Press

Editorial

Library History , Volume 24 (4): 1 – Dec 1, 2008

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
0024-2306
eISSN
1758-3497
DOI
10.1179/174581608X384131
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

library history, Vol. 24 No. 4, December, 2008, 251 Alistair Black This issue of Library History is the third, and last, part of the published proceedings of the conference ‘Making Connections Between Library, Book, Reading and Information History’, held at Leeds Metropolitan University in June 2007. It is also my last issue as editor of the journal, having taken over from the long-serving Keith Manley just about four years ago. I am grateful for the support I have received during my time as editor from staff at the journal’s publisher, Maney, as well as from members of the editorial board, from those who have kindly given up their time to referee articles and from those who have volunteered to review books. I am especially grateful to those who have contributed articles, the subject matter of which has given Library History a truly international fl avour. My thanks also go to Boyd Rayward for his good work as North American editor. I leave Library History in the very capable hands of Toni Weller, who will take the journal into a new era and new territory, under a new name. Mirroring the name of the body that controls the journal (the Library and Information History Group) and that of the Group’s parent organisation (the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals), from March 2009 (Volume 25, Number 1) the title of the journal will change to Library and Information History. The new editor, author of a recent book titled Information History (Chandos, 2008), will no doubt in due course set out the reasons for the change of tack. Suffi ce to say here that the study of, fi rstly, the way people, organizations, and institutions have in the past managed and used information, and secondly, of the links that have existed between library services and librarianship on the one hand, and information services, infrastructure, and occupations on the other, have been under-represented activities in the fi eld of history. Library and Information History will hopefully rectify this defi ciency. © CILIP 2008 DOI 10.1179/174581608X384131

Journal

Library HistoryEdinburgh University Press

Published: Dec 1, 2008

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