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Decolonising Palestinian Liberation Theology: New Methods, Sources and Voices

Decolonising Palestinian Liberation Theology: New Methods, Sources and Voices With the rise of decoloniality in scholarship, contextual theologians have attempted to critically evaluate theology and its Eurocentric epistemological assumptions. Such an attempt has yet to be seriously embarked upon regarding Palestinian Liberation Theology (PLT). Since its academic inception, PLT has been predominantly articulated by two Protestant theologians: Naim Ateek and Mitri Raheb. Although these important theologians are the pioneers of PLT, Ateek and Raheb rely on white-Western theological methods, sources and assumptions. Moreover, the two thinkers primarily target a Western audience, which makes their theology less applicable and relevant to Palestinians. As such, PLT has yet to fundamentally reflect on the many Palestinian sources and methods for constructing an indigenous Palestinian theology. Consequently, this article seeks to indigenise PLT. After examining the coloniality within the work of Ateek and Raheb, the article will argue for new methods and sources for developing PLT. This will include: (1) traditional and local Palestinian Christian practices from the Orthodox tradition and (2) concepts within Palestinian popular resistance and consciousness against settler colonialism. These new methods and sources compensate for some of the limitations PLT currently holds and erode its existing Eurocentric epistemological assumptions. This article is intended to function as a self-critical endeavour on our own Christian theology of liberation in Palestine and invites other Palestinian and Arab theologians to dialogically develop our theologies in a decolonial and intersectional manner. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Studies in World Christianity Edinburgh University Press

Decolonising Palestinian Liberation Theology: New Methods, Sources and Voices

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1354-9901
eISSN
1750-0230
DOI
10.3366/swc.2022.0401
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

With the rise of decoloniality in scholarship, contextual theologians have attempted to critically evaluate theology and its Eurocentric epistemological assumptions. Such an attempt has yet to be seriously embarked upon regarding Palestinian Liberation Theology (PLT). Since its academic inception, PLT has been predominantly articulated by two Protestant theologians: Naim Ateek and Mitri Raheb. Although these important theologians are the pioneers of PLT, Ateek and Raheb rely on white-Western theological methods, sources and assumptions. Moreover, the two thinkers primarily target a Western audience, which makes their theology less applicable and relevant to Palestinians. As such, PLT has yet to fundamentally reflect on the many Palestinian sources and methods for constructing an indigenous Palestinian theology. Consequently, this article seeks to indigenise PLT. After examining the coloniality within the work of Ateek and Raheb, the article will argue for new methods and sources for developing PLT. This will include: (1) traditional and local Palestinian Christian practices from the Orthodox tradition and (2) concepts within Palestinian popular resistance and consciousness against settler colonialism. These new methods and sources compensate for some of the limitations PLT currently holds and erode its existing Eurocentric epistemological assumptions. This article is intended to function as a self-critical endeavour on our own Christian theology of liberation in Palestine and invites other Palestinian and Arab theologians to dialogically develop our theologies in a decolonial and intersectional manner.

Journal

Studies in World ChristianityEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2022

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