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Continuity, Transition and Change: Decorative Plasterwork of Late Seventeenth-Century Scotland

Continuity, Transition and Change: Decorative Plasterwork of Late Seventeenth-Century Scotland William Napier In the seventeenth century Scotland witnessed a flowering of decorative plasterwork. Examples range from elaborate hand-crafted ceilings in royal palaces to simple decorative casts embellishing modest rooms in town houses. This article maps the influences which impacted upon the stylistic development of this form of interior decoration during the transitional post-Restoration period. E n g l i s h Tr a n s i t i o n v e r s u s S c o t t i s h C o n t i n u i t y Decorative plasterwork of early seventeenth-century Scotland evolved differently from that being commissioned by English patrons, generally comprising of a ceiling divided by plaster ribs into highly compartmentalised geometric patterns.1 Pendants of various dimensions were often placed at the intersections of the ribs and the compartments were filled with decorative motifs.2 In essence, plasterwork ceilings in early seventeenth-century Scotland continued sixteenth-century decorative tradition executed in paint, timber and stone (Figure 1). This type of plaster decoration is typified by the two groups of work associated with Pinkie House, Musselburgh (c.1607­10) and Kellie Castle, Fife (1617), and remained popular in houses throughout Scotland for many years, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

Continuity, Transition and Change: Decorative Plasterwork of Late Seventeenth-Century Scotland

Architectural Heritage , Volume 26 (1): 105 – Nov 1, 2015

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© The Architectural Heritage Society of Scotland, 2015
Subject
Historical Studies
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2015.0070
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

William Napier In the seventeenth century Scotland witnessed a flowering of decorative plasterwork. Examples range from elaborate hand-crafted ceilings in royal palaces to simple decorative casts embellishing modest rooms in town houses. This article maps the influences which impacted upon the stylistic development of this form of interior decoration during the transitional post-Restoration period. E n g l i s h Tr a n s i t i o n v e r s u s S c o t t i s h C o n t i n u i t y Decorative plasterwork of early seventeenth-century Scotland evolved differently from that being commissioned by English patrons, generally comprising of a ceiling divided by plaster ribs into highly compartmentalised geometric patterns.1 Pendants of various dimensions were often placed at the intersections of the ribs and the compartments were filled with decorative motifs.2 In essence, plasterwork ceilings in early seventeenth-century Scotland continued sixteenth-century decorative tradition executed in paint, timber and stone (Figure 1). This type of plaster decoration is typified by the two groups of work associated with Pinkie House, Musselburgh (c.1607­10) and Kellie Castle, Fife (1617), and remained popular in houses throughout Scotland for many years,

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2015

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