Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Charlotte Lange and Ailsa Peate, editors. Crime Scenes: Latin American Crime Fiction from the 1960s to the 2010s

Charlotte Lange and Ailsa Peate, editors. Crime Scenes: Latin American Crime Fiction from the... BOOK REVIEWS Charlotte Lange and Ailsa Peate, editors. Crime Scenes: Latin American Crime Fiction from the 1960s to the 2010s. Peter Lang, 2019. US$ 45.95; 9781787074361(PDF); 9781787074378 (ePUB); 9781787074385 (MOBI); 9781787074354 (print, softcover); 244 pages. Reviewed by Linda Ledford-Miller Crime fiction has a long history in Latin America, beginning in the 1940s with the fiction of the Argentine, Jorge Luis Borges, and his collaborator, Adolfo Bioy Casares, and in the late 1950s in Brazil. Variously termed novela negra, género negro, novela detectivesca,or novela policíaca, roughly corresponding respectively to ‘hard-boiled’, ‘detective novel’, and ‘police procedural’, crime fiction in Latin America rarely ventures into the British puzzle or cozy narrative. The text provides an introduction to the tradition and history of crime fiction in Latin America, its relationship to the hard-boiled tradition of the United States, and an overview of production in Mexico, Cuba, Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, and Venezuela. The editors then stake out their territory: the crime scene itself. Crime scene here is not simply the scene of the crime, the locale where the victim is discovered, but rather the extended crime scene of ‘collective culpability’, which may involve state institutions or some aspect of society itself, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Crime Fiction Studies Edinburgh University Press

Charlotte Lange and Ailsa Peate, editors. Crime Scenes: Latin American Crime Fiction from the 1960s to the 2010s

Crime Fiction Studies , Volume 3 (2): 3 – Sep 1, 2022

Loading next page...
 
/lp/edinburgh-university-press/charlotte-lange-and-ailsa-peate-editors-crime-scenes-latin-american-ns86ep0EYQ
Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
Copyright © Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
2517-7982
eISSN
2517-7990
DOI
10.3366/cfs.2022.0075
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

BOOK REVIEWS Charlotte Lange and Ailsa Peate, editors. Crime Scenes: Latin American Crime Fiction from the 1960s to the 2010s. Peter Lang, 2019. US$ 45.95; 9781787074361(PDF); 9781787074378 (ePUB); 9781787074385 (MOBI); 9781787074354 (print, softcover); 244 pages. Reviewed by Linda Ledford-Miller Crime fiction has a long history in Latin America, beginning in the 1940s with the fiction of the Argentine, Jorge Luis Borges, and his collaborator, Adolfo Bioy Casares, and in the late 1950s in Brazil. Variously termed novela negra, género negro, novela detectivesca,or novela policíaca, roughly corresponding respectively to ‘hard-boiled’, ‘detective novel’, and ‘police procedural’, crime fiction in Latin America rarely ventures into the British puzzle or cozy narrative. The text provides an introduction to the tradition and history of crime fiction in Latin America, its relationship to the hard-boiled tradition of the United States, and an overview of production in Mexico, Cuba, Colombia, Argentina, Chile, Costa Rica, and Venezuela. The editors then stake out their territory: the crime scene itself. Crime scene here is not simply the scene of the crime, the locale where the victim is discovered, but rather the extended crime scene of ‘collective culpability’, which may involve state institutions or some aspect of society itself, and

Journal

Crime Fiction StudiesEdinburgh University Press

Published: Sep 1, 2022

There are no references for this article.