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A Case in Point: Carron Bridge, by Aberlour

A Case in Point: Carron Bridge, by Aberlour Ted Ruddock T h e b r i d g e , o f o n e large cast iron arch 150 feet in span (Figure 8.1), listed category A and possibly the longest-spanning cast iron arch still in use in Scotland, was built for the Strathspey Railway near the village of Carron, by Aberlour, in the early 1860s. It consists of three arch ribs which carried two parallel ‘roads’, each borne by crossbeams (now of steel) spanning from the middle arch rib to one of the outside ribs. As built, the roads carried were on one side a timber deck with asphaltic surface for road vehicles and on the other a single-track railway, with a fence between them. All the structural ironwork was cast in Aberdeen by Mackinnon & Co. and designed by Alexander Gibb, engineer of the Railway. The rail passenger services were withdrawn in 1965 and freight trains in 1968. As the road has only to carry a few vehicles it still occupies only its original half of the width of the structure, with traffic moving in only one direction at a time. The bridge spans a beautiful stretch of the river with wooded banks http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Architectural Heritage Edinburgh University Press

A Case in Point: Carron Bridge, by Aberlour

Architectural Heritage , Volume 17 (1): 125 – Nov 1, 2006

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Publisher
Edinburgh University Press
Copyright
© Edinburgh University Press
ISSN
1350-7524
eISSN
1755-1641
DOI
10.3366/arch.2006.17.1.125
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ted Ruddock T h e b r i d g e , o f o n e large cast iron arch 150 feet in span (Figure 8.1), listed category A and possibly the longest-spanning cast iron arch still in use in Scotland, was built for the Strathspey Railway near the village of Carron, by Aberlour, in the early 1860s. It consists of three arch ribs which carried two parallel ‘roads’, each borne by crossbeams (now of steel) spanning from the middle arch rib to one of the outside ribs. As built, the roads carried were on one side a timber deck with asphaltic surface for road vehicles and on the other a single-track railway, with a fence between them. All the structural ironwork was cast in Aberdeen by Mackinnon & Co. and designed by Alexander Gibb, engineer of the Railway. The rail passenger services were withdrawn in 1965 and freight trains in 1968. As the road has only to carry a few vehicles it still occupies only its original half of the width of the structure, with traffic moving in only one direction at a time. The bridge spans a beautiful stretch of the river with wooded banks

Journal

Architectural HeritageEdinburgh University Press

Published: Nov 1, 2006

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