THE CO-DISTRIBUTION OF SPECIES IN RELATION TO THE NEUTRAL THEORY OF COMMUNITY ECOLOGY

THE CO-DISTRIBUTION OF SPECIES IN RELATION TO THE NEUTRAL THEORY OF COMMUNITY ECOLOGY Patterns of species co-distribution have often been used to infer the operation of processes such as competition and selection among species. Ecological specialization should create unexpectedly strong species associations, reflected by high positive or negative correlations between species that are adapted to similar or different kinds of site. Two systematic surveys of plant communities do indeed show stronger associations than are expected in randomly assembled communities. Neutral community models, however, also predict nonrandom patterns of co-distribution. Local selection in heterogeneous landscapes, where species are sorted into the sites to which they are best adapted, will produce even stronger associations, provided that different kinds of site are correlated in space, forming repeated combinations or ““habitats.”” In practice, however, this effect is readily detectable only for intense selection in coarse-grained landscapes. In contrast, classification of species or sites into prior categories consistently produces positive associations, and thereby demonstrates the existence of non-neutral processes structuring communities. It is concluded that the bulk properties of communities, such as overall diversity, may be strongly affected by local dispersal and stochastic drift and, for this reason, are adequately represented by neutral models in many cases, despite the operation of systematic processes of local selection. One corollary of this interpretation is that these bulk properties are unlikely to provide useful information about community processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Ecology Ecological Society of America

THE CO-DISTRIBUTION OF SPECIES IN RELATION TO THE NEUTRAL THEORY OF COMMUNITY ECOLOGY

Ecology, Volume 86 (7) – Jul 1, 2005

Loading next page...
 
/lp/ecological-society-of-america/the-co-distribution-of-species-in-relation-to-the-neutral-theory-of-BJ0Oe6ispd
Publisher
Ecological Society of America
Copyright
Copyright © 2005 by the Ecological Society of America
Subject
Regular Article
ISSN
0012-9658
DOI
10.1890/04-1028
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Patterns of species co-distribution have often been used to infer the operation of processes such as competition and selection among species. Ecological specialization should create unexpectedly strong species associations, reflected by high positive or negative correlations between species that are adapted to similar or different kinds of site. Two systematic surveys of plant communities do indeed show stronger associations than are expected in randomly assembled communities. Neutral community models, however, also predict nonrandom patterns of co-distribution. Local selection in heterogeneous landscapes, where species are sorted into the sites to which they are best adapted, will produce even stronger associations, provided that different kinds of site are correlated in space, forming repeated combinations or ““habitats.”” In practice, however, this effect is readily detectable only for intense selection in coarse-grained landscapes. In contrast, classification of species or sites into prior categories consistently produces positive associations, and thereby demonstrates the existence of non-neutral processes structuring communities. It is concluded that the bulk properties of communities, such as overall diversity, may be strongly affected by local dispersal and stochastic drift and, for this reason, are adequately represented by neutral models in many cases, despite the operation of systematic processes of local selection. One corollary of this interpretation is that these bulk properties are unlikely to provide useful information about community processes.

Journal

EcologyEcological Society of America

Published: Jul 1, 2005

Keywords: abundance ; adaptation ; assembly rules ; co-occurrence ; dispersal ; distribution ; diversity ; neutral model ; range

There are no references for this article.

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create folders to
organize your research

Export folders, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off